Georgic Modernity and British Romanticism: Poetry and the Mediation of History by Kevis GoodmanGeorgic Modernity and British Romanticism: Poetry and the Mediation of History by Kevis Goodman

Georgic Modernity and British Romanticism: Poetry and the Mediation of History

byKevis Goodman

Paperback | March 1, 2008

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Kevis Goodman traces connections between georgic verse and developments in other spheres that were placing unprecedented emphasis on mediation from the late seventeenth to early nineteenth centuries. She expands the subject of the Georgic to broader areas of literary and cultural study--including the history of the feelings, print culture, and early scientific technology. Goodman maintains that the verse form presents ways of perceiving history in terms of sensation, rather than burying history in nature, an approach more usually associated with Romanticism.
Kevis Goodman is Associate Professor of English Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. She has published articles in Studies in Romanticism, ELH and South Atlantic Quarterly.
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Title:Georgic Modernity and British Romanticism: Poetry and the Mediation of HistoryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:March 1, 2008Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521057299

ISBN - 13:9780521057295

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Georgic Modernity: sensory media and the affect of history; 1. The Georgics and the cultivation of mediums, 1660-1712; 2. The microscopic eye and the noise of history in Thomson's The Seasons; 3. Cowper's Georgic of the news: the 'loophole' in the retreat; 4. Aural histories in The Excursion: 'Passages of life'.

Editorial Reviews

"Kevis Goodman has written a compelling book that should cause us to re-think how we go about the work of Romantic historicism as well as how we might begin to conceive of our very sense of history as an object of criticism, knowledge, or feeling. Her book is praiseworthy because its reading of history in poems cannot be reduced to certain ideology critiques, nor does it completely refuse them." Romanticism on the NetThomas Stuby, University of Washington