German Poetry From The Beginnings To 1750: Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Martin Luther, by Ingrid Walsøe-EngelGerman Poetry From The Beginnings To 1750: Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Martin Luther, by Ingrid Walsøe-Engel

German Poetry From The Beginnings To 1750: Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Martin Luther,

EditorIngrid Walsøe-Engel

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Foreword by George C. Schoolfield
"I am Wolfram von Eschenbach and I know a little about singing"; thus does perhaps the most unique personality in medieval German literature introduce himself to readers. The second part of the statement is one of the greatest understatements in the realm of literature. He is the author of two unfinished works, Willehalm and Titurel (b...
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Title:German Poetry From The Beginnings To 1750: Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Martin Luther,Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8.26 × 5.4 × 1.12 inPublisher:Bloomsbury

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0826403387

ISBN - 13:9780826403384

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Table of Contents

Foreword: George C. Schoolfield
Introduction: Ingrid Walsoe-Engel
¿
ANONYMOUS
Erster Merseburger Zauberspruch/First Merseburg Spell
(Carroll Hightower)
Zweiter Merseburger Zauberspruch/Second Merseburg Spell
(Carroll Hightower)
Muspilli* (ninth century)/Muspilli
(Carroll Hightower)
Weingartner Reisesegen* (tenth century)/The Weingarten Travel Blessing (tenth century)
(Carroll Hightower)
From Carmina Burana*/From Carmina Burana
(Sylvia Stevens)
¿
ANONYMOUS (twelfth century)
Du bist min, ich bin din/I have thee, thou hast me
(Alexander Gode)
Mich dunket niht so guotes, noch so lobesam/To me nothing seems as splendid nor as praiseworthy
(Sylvia Stevens)
¿
DER VON KURENBERG (c. 1150-70)
Ich stuont mir nehtint spate an einer zinnen/Late at night I stood on a battlement
(Frederick Goldin)
Ich zoch mir einen valken mere danne ein jar/I trained me a falcon, for more than a year
(Frederick Goldin)
Der tunkele sterne/The Morning Star
(Frederick Goldin)
Wip unde vederspil diu werdent lihte zam/Woman and falcons-they are easily tamed
(Frederick Goldin)
¿
PSEUDO-DIETMAR VON EIST (c. 1150)
Ez stuont ein frouwe alleine/A lady stood alone
(J.W. Thomas)
So wol dir, sumerwunne!/Gay summer's bliss, good-bye!
(J.W. Thomas)
¿
MEINLOH VON SEVELINGEN (writing c. 1170-80)
Mir erwelten miniu ougen/My eyes have seen and chosen
(J.W. Thomas)
So we den merkaeren!/Woe then to the gossips!
(J.W. Thomas)
¿
DIETMAR VON EIST (?-1171?)
Uf der linden obene da sanc ein kleinez vogellin/Yonder on the linden tree there sang a merry little bird
(J.W. Thomas)
Wie mohte mir min herze werden iemer rehte fruot/How can I hope a wise heart to attain
(Carroll Hightower)
¿
FRIEDRICH VON HAUSEN (?-1190)
Deich von der guoten schiet/When I parted from my Good
(Frederick Goldin)
Wafena, wie hat mich Minne gelazen!/Help! How Minne has deserted me
(Frederick Goldin)
Ich denke under wilen/I think sometimes about what i would tell her
(Frederick Goldin)
Si darf mich des zihen niet/She may not accuse me
(Sylvia Stevens)
Min herze und min lip diu wellent scheiden/My heart and my body want to separate
(Frederick Goldin)
¿
HEINRICH VON VELDEKE (1140/50-1200/1210)
We mich scade ane miner vrouwen/Whoever hurts my favor with my lady
(Frederick Goldin)
Tristrant muste ane sinen danc/Tristan had no choice
(Frederick Goldin)
In den aprillen, so di blumen springen/In April when the flowers spring
(Frederick Goldin)
¿
ALBRECHT VON JOHANNSDORF (late twelfth century)
Wie sich minne hebt, daz weiz ich wol/This I know, how love begins to be
(M.L. Richey)
Ich vant ane huote/I discovered the sweet lovely lady
(Sylvia Stevens)
Guote liute, holt die gabe/Good folk, go gain the gifts
(F.C. Nicholson)
¿
HEINRICH VON MORUNGEN (?-1222)
Hete ich tugende niht so vil von ir vernomen/Had I not perceived so much of worth in her
(F.C. Nicholson)
Von den elben/Many a man gets bewitched by the elves
(Frederick Goldin)
Ich wene, nieman lebe der minen kumber weine/I believe there is no one alive who weeps for my sorrow
(Frederick Goldin)
Ich hort uf der heide/I heard on the meadow
(Frederick Goldin)
Owe, sol aber mir iemer me?/Alas, shall I not see again?
(Frederick Goldin)
Mirst geschen als eime kindeline/It has gone with me as with a child
(Frederick Goldin)
Vil sueziu senftiu toterinne/You sweet soft murderess
(Frederick Goldin)
¿
HARTMANM VON AUE (1160/65-after 1210)
Ich sprach, ich wolte ir iemer leben/I said I would always live for her
(Frederick Goldin)
Manger gruezet mich also/Often a friend will greet me thus
(Frederick Goldin)
Ich var mit iuweren hulden/I go with your good grace
(Frederick Goldin)

REINMAR DER ALTE (1160/65-c.1205)
Waz ich nu niuwer maere sage/No one needs to ask
(Frederick Goldin)
Lieber bote, nu wirp also/Messenger, hear what I say
(J.W. Thomas)

WALTHER VON DER VOGELWEIDE (c.1170-c.1230)
Ich saz uf eime steine/I sat down on a rock
(Frederick Goldin)
Ir sult sprechen willekomen/You should bid me welcome
(Frederick Goldin)
Lange swigen des hat ich gedaht/To be long silent was my thought
(Frederick Goldin)
Saget mir ieman, waz ist minne/Will anyone tell me what Minne is?
(Frederick Goldin)
Under der linden/Under the lime tree
(Frederick Goldin)
Nemt, frowe, disen kranz/Lady, take this garland
(Frederick Goldin)
Herzeliebez frowelin/Dearly beloved gentle girl
(Frederick Goldin)
Ir reinen wip, ir werden man/You excellent women, you valient men
(Frederick Goldin)
Allererst lebe ich mir werde/Now my life has gained some meaning
(J.W. Thomas)
Ouwe, war sint verswunden alliu miniu jar!/Alas, all my years, where have they disappeared!
(Frederick Goldin)
Owe, daz wizheit unde jugent/Alas, that wisdom, and youth
(Frederick Goldin)

WOLFRAM VON ESCHENBACH (1170/75-1220)
Sine klawen/Its claws have struck through the clouds
(Frederick Goldin)
Der helnden minne ir klage/You always sang at break of day
(Frederick Goldin)
NEIDHART VON REUENTHAL (1185/90-c.1245)
Frout iuch, junge unde alte!/Young and old, rejoice
(Frederick Goldin)
Sumer, diner suezen weter muezen wir uns anen/Summer, now we must live without your sweet weather
(Frederick Goldin)
Sinc an, guldin huon! ichgibe dir weize!/Sing, my golden cock, I'll give thee grain!
(J.W. Thomas)
Mirst von herzen leide/There is pain in my heart
(Frederick Goldin)
¿
STEINMAR (late thirteenth century)
Ein knecht der lag verborgen/A farmhand lay all hidden
(James J. Wilhelm)
Sit si mir niht lonen wil/Since she gives so little pay
(J.W. Thomas)
¿
OSWALD VON WOLKENSTEIN (1377-1445)
Simm Gredlin, Gret, mein Gredelein/O Margie, Marge, dear Margaret
(J.W. Thomas)
¿
MARTIN LUTHER (1483-1546)
Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott/A mighty fortress is our God
(Lutheran Book of Worship, 1978)
Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir/From depths of woe I cry to you
(F. Samuel Janow)
Von Himmel hoch da komm ich her/From heaven above to earth I come
(Lutheran Book of Worship, 1978)
Mitten wyr ym leben sind/In the very midst of life
(F. Samuel Janow)
¿
ULRICH VON HUTTEN (1488-1523)
Ein neu Lied Herr Ulrichs von Hutten/Ulrich von Hutten's Song
(Catherine Winkworth)
¿
HANS SACHS (1494-1576)
Ein schone Taqweis: von dem Wort Gottes/A Fair Melody: To Be Sung by Good Christians
(Catherine Winkworth)