Gesture And The Nature Of Language by David F. ArmstrongGesture And The Nature Of Language by David F. Armstrong

Gesture And The Nature Of Language

byDavid F. Armstrong, William C. Stokoe, Sherman E. Wilcox

Paperback | March 31, 1995

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This book proposes a radical alternative to dominant views of the evolution of language, in particular the origins of syntax. The authors draw on evidence from areas such as primatology, anthropology, and linguistics to present a groundbreaking account of the notion that language emerged through visible bodily action. Written in a clear and accessible style, Gesture and the Nature of Language will be indispensable reading for all those interested in the origins of language.
Title:Gesture And The Nature Of LanguageFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:272 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.63 inShipping dimensions:8.5 × 5.43 × 0.63 inPublished:March 31, 1995Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521467721

ISBN - 13:9780521467728

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface; 1. The universe of gesture; 2. The nature of gesture; 3. Are signed and spoken languages differently organized?; 4. Is language modular?; 5. Do we have a genetically programmed drive to acquire language?; 6. Language from the body politic; 7. The origin of syntax: gesture as name and relation; 8. Language from the body: an evolutionary perspective; References; Index.

From Our Editors

This book proposes a radical alternative to dominant views of the evolution of language, and in particular the origins of syntax. The authors argue that manual and vocal communication developed in parallel, and that the basic elements of syntax are intrinsic to gesture.

Editorial Reviews

'This book links studies of sign language and gesture with recent ideas about human evolution in a highly interesting way. It presents the important idea of 'semantic phonology' and suggests how syntax may have arisen from the inherent structure of practical actions.' Adam Kendon