Getting To Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

by Roger Fisher, William L. Ury, Bruce Patton

Penguin Publishing Group | May 3, 2011 | Trade Paperback

Getting To Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In is rated 3.5 out of 5 by 2.
The key text on problem-solving negotiation-updated and revised

Since its original publication nearly thirty years ago, Getting to Yes has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution.

Getting to Yes offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 240 pages, 7.7 × 5.1 × 0.6 in

Published: May 3, 2011

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0143118757

ISBN - 13: 9780143118756

Found in: Negotiating

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Useful read A practical book that offers an easy-to-apply framework to understanding the world of negotiation.
Date published: 2014-06-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A good and usefull book, but why is it that long? The audio book comes on 6 CDs. All this info could easily fit into just 2 CDs or maybe even less. That feel that the book is... may I use the word "diluted"? The example conversations are very good, but why are there just a few of them?!!! Many topics are covered as a high level overview. In my opinion, in such book authors should pay more attentions to details on how to lead a conversation and less - to the general concepts. I definitely recommend this book to those for whom negotiations are a part of their job. It might be useful for others, but do not be surprised if you find that 75% is nothing else, but just common sense and you already know it. Do not get me wrong. 25% is not bad. I do not feel sorry for buying and listening to this book and I would do it again. It does not deserve A mark, but deserves B.
Date published: 2008-07-10

– More About This Product –

Getting To Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

Getting To Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

by Roger Fisher, William L. Ury, Bruce Patton

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 240 pages, 7.7 × 5.1 × 0.6 in

Published: May 3, 2011

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0143118757

ISBN - 13: 9780143118756

About the Book

The key text on problem-solving negotiation-updated and revised
Since its original publication nearly thirty years ago, "Getting to Yes" has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution. "Getting to Yes" offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.

Read from the Book

 Chapter 4: Invent Options for Mutual GainThe case of Israel and Egypt negotiating over who should keep how much of the Sinai Peninsula illustrates both a major problem in negotiation and a key opportunity.the pie that leaves both parties satisfied. Often you are negotiating along a single dimension, such as the amount of territory, the price of a car, the length of a lease on an apartment, or the size of a commission on a sale. At other times you face what appears to be an either/or choice that is either markedly favorable to you or to the other side. In a divorce settlement, who gets the house? Who gets custody of the children? You may see the choice as one between winning and losing- and neither side will agree to lose. Even if you do win and get the car for $12,000, the lease for five years, or the house and kids, you have a sinking feeling that they will not let you forget it. Whatever the situation, your choices seem limited.option like a demilitarized Sinai can often make the difference between deadlock and agreement. One lawyer we know attributes his success directly to his ability to invent solutions advantageous to both his client and the other side. He expands the pie before dividing it. Skill at inventing options is one of the most useful assets a negotiator can have.Yet all too often negotiators end up like the proverbial children who quarreled over an orange. After they finally agreed to divide the orange in half, the first child took one half, ate the fruit, an
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From the Publisher

The key text on problem-solving negotiation-updated and revised

Since its original publication nearly thirty years ago, Getting to Yes has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution.

Getting to Yes offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.

About the Author

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor of Law Emeritus and director emeritus of the Harvard Negotiation Project.

William Ury cofounded the Harvard Negotiation Project and is the award-winning author of several books on negotiation.

Bruce Patton is cofounder and Distinguished Fellow of the Harvard Negotiation Project and the author of Difficult Conversations, a New York Times bestseller.