Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples: What The Opt-out Phenomenon Can Teach Us About Work And Family by Dianna ShandyGlass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples: What The Opt-out Phenomenon Can Teach Us About Work And Family by Dianna Shandy

Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples: What The Opt-out Phenomenon Can Teach Us About Work And Family

byDianna Shandy, Karine Moe

Paperback | October 15, 2009

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When significant numbers of college-educated American women began, in the early twenty-first century, to leave paid work to become stay-at-home mothers, an emotionally charged national debate erupted. Karine Moe and Dianna Shandy, a professional economist and an anthropologist, respectively, decided to step back from the sometimes overheated rhetoric around the so-called mommy wars. They wondered what really inspired women to opt out, and they wanted to gauge the phenomenon’s genuine repercussions. Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples is the fruit of their investigation—a rigorous, accessible, and sympathetic reckoning with this hot-button issue in contemporary life.

Drawing on hundreds of interviews from around the country, original survey research, and national labor force data, Moe and Shandy refocus the discussion of women who opt out from one where they are the object of scrutiny to one where their aspirations and struggles tell us about the far broader swath of American women who continue to juggle paid work and family. Moe and Shandy examine the many pressures that influence a woman’s decision to resign, reduce, or reorient her career. These include the mismatch between child-care options and workplace demands, the fact that these women married men with demanding careers, the professionalization of stay-at-home motherhood, and broad failures in public policy. But Moe and Shandy are equally attentive to the resilience of women in the face of life decisions that might otherwise threaten their sense of self-worth. Moe and Shandy find, for instance, that women who have downsized their careers stress the value of social networks—of ?running with a pack of smart women? who’ve also chosen to emphasize motherhood over paid work.

DIANNA SHANDY is an associate professor of anthropology at Macalester College. She is the author of Nuer-American Passages: Globalizing Sudanese Migration. KARINE MOE is a professor of economics at Macalester College. She is the editor of Women, Family, and Work: Writings on the Economics of Gender.
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Title:Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples: What The Opt-out Phenomenon Can Teach Us About Work And FamilyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.6 inPublished:October 15, 2009Publisher:University of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820334049

ISBN - 13:9780820334042

Reviews

Table of Contents

Prologue ix
Acknowledgments xiii

introduction 1
one. Numbers Too Big to Ignore 11
two. Why Opting Out Is an Everywoman Issue 2
three. The 100- Hour Couple 35
four. Glass Ceilings and Maternal Walls 45
five. Second Shift Redux 61
six. Child Care Dilemmas 72
seven. Mama Time 83
eight. The Hectic Household 97
nine. The Professionalization of At- Home Motherhood 114
ten. Financial Costs 127
eleven. Negotiating without a Paycheck 139
twelve. Reigniting the Career 149
thirteen. Creative Strategies for Making Work "Work" 163
fourteen. Coming of Age in America 173

Notes 183
Bibliography 197
Index 209

Editorial Reviews

This provocative book raises many questions but does not stoop to providing pat answers about how couples should manage the work-family balance.

- Choice