Global Ecology in Human Perspective

Paperback | March 1, 1987

byCharles H. Southwick

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Written by a well-known ecologist with more than forty years of scientific field work on six continents, this book deals with the ecology of planet earth, focusing on the condition of the global environment and the quality of human life. The author describes the scope and meaning of globalecology and gives a brief review of ecological principles relevant to global concerns. The work concentrates on how we as humans affect global ecosystems and how these changes impact our health, behavior, economics, and politics. Specific sections address the ecological components of planet earth,the biosphere, ecosystem ecology, worldwide environmental trends, and the state of human populations. Other chapters deal with competition and conflict, the ecology of war, an agenda for survival, sustainability, and future prospects. Accessible to undergraduates, students in adult and professional education, and general readers, this unique work gives a broader definition of our environment than conventional ecology books, emphasizing economic and social dimensions of the global environment. It covers diverse viewpoints,including good news and favorable trends regarding the future, and helps readers think about current ecological problems and those we will face in the future. It discusses how to relate facts and beliefs, how to assess outcomes, and, finally, how me might view and treat the one world in which welive.

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From Our Editors

Written by a well-known ecologist with more than forty years of scientific field work on six continents, this book deals with the ecology of planet earth, focusing on the condition of the global environment and the quality of human life. The author describes the scope and meaning of global ecology and gives a brief review of ecological...

From the Publisher

Written by a well-known ecologist with more than forty years of scientific field work on six continents, this book deals with the ecology of planet earth, focusing on the condition of the global environment and the quality of human life. The author describes the scope and meaning of globalecology and gives a brief review of ecological ...

Charles H. Southwick is at University of Colorado (Emeritus).
Format:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 6.14 × 9.21 × 0.71 inPublished:March 1, 1987Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195098676

ISBN - 13:9780195098679

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Table of Contents

IntroductionPART I. INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL ECOLOGYChapter 1. The Meaning and Scope of Global EcologyA Few Basic DefinitionsThe EnvironmentPlanet Earth in the UniverseSummary and ReferencesChapter 2. Properties and Components of Planet EarthThe Lithosphere or GeosphereThe HydrosphereThe AtmosphereAtmospheric WeatherClimateThe BiosphereComponent InteractionsChapter 3. The BiosphereExtent of the BiosphereFunctional Properties of the BiosphereEnvironmental Buffering and HomeostasisThe Gaia HypothesisPART II. BASIC ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGYChapter 4. Ecological Principles: EcosystemsSome Basic Principles of EcologyEcosystem StructureAbiotic SubstancesProducer OrganismsConsumer OrganismsDecomposer Organisms and DetritivoresIncomplete EcosystemsCybernetic Control in EcosystemsSystems Analysis and Modeling in EcologyChapter 5. Ecosystem Organization and FunctionThe Hydrologic CycleThe Carbon CycleThe Nitrogen CycleThe Phosphorus CycleThe Sulfur CycleChapter 6. Energy Flow and Trophic StructureThe Source of EnergyFood Chains and Trophic StructureEcologic PyramidsEcologic EfficienciesEnergy and Human ActivitiesChapter 7. Ecosystem Homeostasis, Succession and StabilityHomeostasisHomeostasis in EcosystemsGlobal Implications of Ecosystem HomeostasisTrophic Structure and Ecosystem StabilityEcosystem Development and SuccessionThe Conservation of DiversityThe Controversy over Old-Growth ForestsPART III. HUMAN IMPACTS ON PLANET EARTHChapter 8. Our Global Condition: A Clash of ConceptsGlobal 2000Opponents of Global 2000EvaluationChapter 9. Global Change and DevelopmentHuman Modification of the EarthSustainable DevelopmentImplications of Sustainable DevelopmentChapter 10. Land DegradationThe Loss of Functional LandscapeErosion in Developing CountriesOther Forms of Land DegradationThe Positive Side of Land ModificationChapter 11. DesertificationDefinitions and Categories of DesertsNatural DesertsAnthropogenic DesertsThe Extent of Deserts and DesertificationDesertification in the SahelDesertification in the United StatesChapter 12. DeforestationThe Extent of Forest EcosystemsThe Ecological Role of ForestsForest TypesTropical ForestsTemperate DeforestationCauses of DeforestationThe Role of Forests in Global EcologyWhat Can Be Done?Chapter 13. Historical Aspects of Environmental DestructionThe Ecological Relationships of Hunter-GatherersThe Domestication of Plants and AnimalsThe Rise of AgricultureCivilizations of the Middle EastRelevance of Environmental History to Modern ProblemsNorth Africa and the MediterraneanEnvironmental Destruction in Other Parts of the WorldChapter 14. Population EcologyBasic Population BiologyPatterns of Population ChangeGrowth PatternsMalthusian GrowthLogistic GrowthReproductive Patterns: "r" and "K" SelectionDensity-Dependent and Density-Independent FactorsChapter 15. Human PopulationsWhy Is Human Population Growth Occurring?Where is World Population Growth Occurring?Urban GrowthFuture ProspectsPopulation ModelingGovernmental ResponsesChapter 16. World Food SuppliesMagnitude of the ProblemThe Consequences of Food ShortagesA Brief History of FamineWorld Food Production and Human Population Growth Since 1950The Green RevolutionRisks of the Green RevolutionRegional Successes and Failures of the Green RevolutionThe Future of World AgricultureRecent TrendsFood From the OceansChapter 17. Air PollutionSources of Air PollutionTypes of Air PollutionOther Ways of Classifying Air PollutionHuman Interest BoxEnvironmental Influences on Air PollutionEcological Effects of Air Pollution Effects on Natural Ecosystems Effects on Agroecosystems Effects on Human Health Effects on MaterialsControl of Air PollutionTrends in Air PollutionChapter 18. Weather and Climate ChangeForces for Warming: The Greenhouse EffectIs Global Warming a Reality?Forces for Global CoolingAtmospheric TurbidityForces in ConflictVariabilityChapter 19. Water Pollution and Ocean EcologyClassifying Water PollutionOther Ways of Classifying Water PollutionCoastal and Oceanic PollutionThe Extent of the OceansOcean ProductivityFurther Evidence of Deterioration in Marine EcosystemsAre the Oceans in Jeopardy?Chapter 20. The Crisis in BiodiversityWhat Is a Species?The Measurement of DiversityStatistical Representations of DiversityPatterns of BiodiversityWhy Are There so Many Species?Human Impacts on BiodiversityIs There a Crisis in Biodiversity?Does Diversity Make Any Difference?Biodiversity and Human Food SuppliesThe Role of Biodiversity in Forestry and Environmental RestorationBiodiversity and the Energy IndustryBiodiversity and the Pharmaceutical IndustryBiodiversity and Ecosystem ServicesHow Many Species Does the Earth Really Need?Diversity and StabilityPART IV. HUMAN PROSPECTS AND THE QUALITY OF LIFEChapter 21. The Human Condition: Economics, Demography, and HealthEcology and World HealthThe Problem of DisparityEconomic DisparitiesDisparities in the Quality of LifeThe Poverty GapChapter 22. Global Patterns of HealthIndustrial High-Income NationsDeveloping Low-Income NationsImplications for Public HealthHuman Immune Viruses and AIDSConvergence in World Health PatternsChapter 23. Competition and ConflictCompetition and EvolutionForms of CompetitionInterspecific CompetitionCompetition and CooperationThe Severity of CompetitionCommunication or Violence?Hierarchies and TerritoriesAnimal ViolenceHuman AggressionViolence in AmericaChapter 24. The Ecology of WarThe Causes of WarA Brief Environmental History of WarEnvironmental Aspects of War in the Twentieth CenturyThe Persian GulfNuclear WarNuclear WinterThe Cold WarIndirect Costs of ConflictSigns of ProgressChapter 25. SustainabilityHistory and DefinitionsFacing the FactsIs Sustainability Possible?Sustainability in Natural EcosystemsHuman-Dominated EcosystemsCriteria for SustainabilityRestoration EcologyGoals of RestorationThe Bottom LineChapter 26. Assessment and AgendaThe World According to EcologyA Brief Review of the Ecological EvidenceThe World According to Entrepreneurial EconomicsA Brief Review of the Positive EvidenceAn Agenda for Planet EarthEcological PrioritiesProfessional ResponsibilitiesPersonal ResponsibilitiesChapter 27. PrognosisThreats to ProgressWhat is Needed?ReferencesGlossaryBibliographyIndexEach chapter ends with a summary and references

From Our Editors

Written by a well-known ecologist with more than forty years of scientific field work on six continents, this book deals with the ecology of planet earth, focusing on the condition of the global environment and the quality of human life. The author describes the scope and meaning of global ecology and gives a brief review of ecological principles relevant to global concerns. The work concentrates on how we as humans affect global ecosystems and how these changes impact our health, behavior, economics, and politics. Specific sections address the ecological components of planet earth, the biosphere, ecosystem ecology, worldwide environmental trends, and the state of human populations. Other chapters deal with competition and conflict, the ecology of war, an agenda for survival, sustainability, and future prospects. Accessible to undergraduates, students in adult and professional education, and general readers, this unique work gives a broader definition of our environment than conventional ecology books, emphasizing economic and social dimensions of the global envir

Editorial Reviews

"So readable and well referenced. I shall structure my Math and Environment course around it."--Delene Perley, Walsh University