Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account by Gillian Brock

Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account

byGillian Brock

Paperback | February 8, 2009

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Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skepticabout global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The model addresses concernsabout implementation in the world, showing how we can move from theory to public policy that makes progress toward global justice. It also makes clear how legitimate forms of nationalism are compatible with commitments to global justice. Global Justice is divided into three central parts. In the first, Brock defends a cosmopolitan model of global justice. In the second, which is largely concerned with public policy issues, she argues that there is much we can and should do toward achieving global justice. She addresses severalpressing problems, discussing both theoretical and public policy issues involved with each. These include tackling global poverty, taxation reform, protection of basic liberties, humanitarian intervention, immigration, and problems associated with global economic arrangements. In the third part,she shows how the discussion of public policy issues can usefully inform our theorizing; in particular, it assists our thinking about the place of nationalism and equality in an account of global justice.

About The Author

Gillian Brock is Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. She has co-edited or edited three recent anthologies in the field: iCurrent Debates in Global Justice/i (with Darrel Moellendorf, Springer, 2005), iThe Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism/i (with Harry Brighouse, Cambridge, 2005), and ...
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Details & Specs

Title:Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan AccountFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pagesPublished:February 8, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199230943

ISBN - 13:9780199230945

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Table of Contents

Part I: Theory1. Global Justice and Cosmopolitanism: An Introduction2. The Debate about Rawls' Law of Peoples: Critics and Defenses3. A Cosmopolitan Model of Global Justice: the Basic Framework4. Global Governance and the Nationalist Challenge: What does Authentic Democracy Require?Part II: Moving from Theory to Public Policy: Closing the Gap Between Theory and Practice5. Global Poverty, Taxation, and Global Justice6. Basic Liberties and Global Justice7. Humanitarian Intervention8. Immigration9. The Global Economic Order and Global JusticePart III: From Public Policy back to Theory10. What Do We Owe Co-Nationals and Non-Nationals? Why the Liberal Nationalist Account Fails and How we Can Do Better11. Has my Model Made Adequate Space for Legitimate Forms of Nationalism?12. Equality, Cosmopolitanism, and Global Justice13. Skepticism about Feasibility and Conclusions