Global Justice and Bioethics

Hardcover | February 9, 2012

EditorJoseph Millum, Ezekiel Emanuel

not yet rated|write a review
Despite the massive scale of global inequalities, until recently few political philosophers or bioethicists addressed their ethical implications. Questions of justice were thought to be primarily internal to the nation state. Over the last decade or so, there has been an explosion of interestin the philosophical issues surrounding global justice. These issues are of direct relevance to bioethics. The links between poverty and health imply that we cannot separate questions of global health from questions about fair distribution of global resources and the institutions governing the worldorder. Similarly, as increasing numbers of medical trials are conducted in the developing world, researchers and their sponsors have to confront the special problems of doing research in an unjust world, with corresponding obligations to correct injustice and avoid exploitation.This book presents a collection of original essays by leading thinkers in political theory, philosophy, and bioethics. They address the key issues concerning global justice and bioethics from two perspectives. The first is ideal theory, which is concerned with the social institutions that wouldregulate a just world. What is the relationship between human rights and the provision of health care? How, if at all, should a global order distinguish between obligations to compatriots and others? The second perspective is from non-ideal theory, which governs how people should behave in theunjust world in which we actually find ourselves. What sort of medical care should actual researchers working in impoverished countries offer their subjects? What should NGOs do in the face of cultural practices with which they deem unethical? If coordinated international action will not happen,what ought individual states to do? These questions have more than theoretical interest; their answers are of direct practical import for policymakers, researchers, advocates, NGOs, scholars, and others. This book is the first collection to comprehensively address the intersection of global justice and bioethical dilemmas.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$45.00

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Despite the massive scale of global inequalities, until recently few political philosophers or bioethicists addressed their ethical implications. Questions of justice were thought to be primarily internal to the nation state. Over the last decade or so, there has been an explosion of interestin the philosophical issues surrounding glob...

Ezekiel J.Emanuel is Chair of the Department of Bioethics at the Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health; co-editor of Ethical Issues in International Biomedical Research and The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:336 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.98 inPublished:February 9, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019537990X

ISBN - 13:9780195379907

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Global Justice and Bioethics

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. Joseph Millum and Ezekiel J. Emanuel: IntroductionIdeal Theory2. Global Bioethics and Political Theory: Global Bioethics and Political Theory3. Mathias Risse: Is there a Human Right to Essential Pharmaceuticals? The Global Common, the Intellectual Common, and the Possibility of Private Intellectual Property4. Jonathan Wolff: Global Justice and Health: The Basis of the Global Health Duty5. Allen Buchanan and Robert O. Keohane: Justice in the Diffusion of InnovationNon-ideal Theory6. Gopal Sreenivasan: What is Non-Ideal Theory?7. Ezekiel J. Emanuel: Global Justice and the "Standard of Care" Debates8. Robert E. Goodin: The Bioethics of Second-Best9. Lisa Fuller: INGO Health Programs in a Non-Ideal World: Imperialism, Respect and Procedural Justice10. Nir Eyal: Promoting Global Health Through Accreditation: the Case of Medical Tourism11. Alan Wertheimer: The Obligations of Researchers Amidst Injustice or Deprivation