Globalization in Practice

Paperback | July 3, 2014

EditorNigel Thrift, Adam Tickell, Steve Woolgar

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The concept of globalization has become ubiquitous in social science and in the public consciousness and is often invoked as an explanation for a diverse range of changes to economies, societies, politics and cultures - both as a positive liberating force and as a wholly negative one. Whilstour understanding of the politics, economics, and social resonance of the phenomenon has become increasingly sophisticated at the macro-level, this book argues that globalization too often continues to be depicted as a set of extra-terrestrial forces with no real physical manifestation, except aseffects. The essays challenge this dominant understanding of 'globalization from above' through explorations of the mundane means by which globalization has been achieved. Instead of a focus on the meta-political economy of global capitalism, the book concentrates on the everyday life of capitalism, thenot-so-'little' things that keep the 'large' forces of globalization ticking over. With its eye on the mundane, the book demonstrates that a series of everyday and, consequently, all but invisible formations critically facilitate and create the conditions under which globalization has flourished.The emphasis is on concrete moments in the history of capitalism when these new means of regular reproduction were invented and deployed. Only by understanding these infrastructures can we understand the dynamics of globalization.In short, punchy essays by distinguished researchers from across a range of disciplines, this book provides a new way of understanding globalization, moving away from the standard accounts of global forces, economic flows, and capitalist dynamics, to show how ordinary practices and artefacts arecrucial elements and symbols of globalization.

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The concept of globalization has become ubiquitous in social science and in the public consciousness and is often invoked as an explanation for a diverse range of changes to economies, societies, politics and cultures - both as a positive liberating force and as a wholly negative one. Whilstour understanding of the politics, economics,...

Nigel Thrift is Vice-Chancellor of the University of Warwick. He joined Warwick from the University of Oxford where he was made Head of the Division of Life and Environmental Sciences in 2003 before becoming Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research in 2005. He has been the recipient of a number of distinguished academic awards including the R...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:July 3, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199212635

ISBN - 13:9780199212637

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Table of Contents

IntroductionNigel Thrift, Adam Tickell, and Steve Woolgar: Respecifying GlobalizationTravel, tourism, and mobilityPeter Adey: AirportsNick Clarke: BackpackingTim Ingold: WalkingEric Laurier: Mobile PhonePeter Merriman: MobilityAnnmarie Mol: World MapsHarvey Molotch: Airport SecurityJohn Torpey: PassportsJohn Urry and David Holley: Business TravelJackie West: Sex WorkersAlexandra Woolgar: Gap YearInfrastructure and transportAndrew Barry: PipelinesStephen J. Collier and Nino Kemoklidze: Pipes and WiresStephen Graham: Automated Repair and Back-up SystemsDaniel Neyland and Steve Woolgar: Global Recycling: The Case of Electronic WasteDaniel Neyland and Steve Woolgar: Road Safety and Traffic ManagementSusan M. Roberts: ContainersPaul Routledge: Resisting the GlobalHelen Sampson: Globalization of a Labour Market: The Case of SeafarersMichael J. Watts: Banal Globalization: The Deep Structure of Oil and GasRagna Zeiss: Putting Standards to Work The Taste and Smell of GlobalizationFinance and businessAlex Hughes: FlowersMichael Levi: Bureaux de ChangeDonald MacKenzie: LIBORKris Olds: Taking Note of Export EarningsBarbara Penner: Filthy Lucre: Urine for SaleJocelyn Pixley: Emotion in FinanceTimothy J. Sinclair: Credit Rating AgenciesJanine R. Wedel: Globalization s Freelancers, Democracy s Decline: Harvard, the Chubais Clan, and U.S. Aid to RussiaCaitlin Zaloom: Stock TradingMedia, consumption, and leisureFranck Cochoy: Cigarette Packages: The Big Red Chevron and the 282 Little KidsRebecca M. Ellis: Collecting and Consumption in the Era of eBayChristian Heath: Interaction Order of Auctions of Fine Art and AntiquesAdrian Johns: Intellectual PropertyCelia Lury: Curvature of Global Brand SpaceVijay Mishra: BollywoodGerard Toal: Global News (Service) NetworksSumei Wang and Elizabeth Shove: How Rounders Goes Around the WorldHealth and natureGeoffrey C. Bowker: Biodiversity and GlobalizationCatelijne Coopmans: Mobility and the Medical ImageChristopher Hall, Sue Peckover, and Sue White: e-Solutions to Sharing Information in Child Protection: the Rise and Fall of ContactPointMimi Sheller: Globalizing of Bananas: Of Rhizomes, Fungi, and Mobility SystemsOrder and controlNicholas Gill: Forms that FormPeter Miller: Accounting for the Calculating SelfDaniel Neyland: Replaying Society to the World Through CCTVTom Osborne: AK-47 as a Material Global ArtefactSharyn Roach Anleu: Human RightsClassificationsRoger Burrows: Area Based ClassificationsJurgen Gerhards: First Names: Examples from GermanyLucy Kimbell: One of My Top Ten DaysRob Kitchin and Martin Dodge: Barcodes and RDIFWendy Larner: ISO 9000Helen Verran: Number