Globalizing Transitional Justice

Paperback | December 15, 2015

byRuti G. Teitel

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Among the most prominent and significant political and legal developments since the end of the Cold War is the proliferation of mechanisms for addressing the complex challenges of transition from authoritarian rule to human rights-based democratic constitutionalism, particularly with regardsto the demands for accountability in relation to conflicts and abuses of the past. Whether one thinks of the Middle East, South Africa, the Balkans, Latin America, or Cambodia, an extraordinary amount of knowledge has been gained and processes instituted through transitional justice. No longer abyproduct or afterthought, transitional justice is unquestionably the driver of political change. In Globalizing Transitional Justice, Ruti G. Teitel provides a collection of her own essays that embody her evolving reflections on the practice and discourse of transitional justice since her book Transitional Justice published back in 2000. In this new book, Teitel focuses on the ways in whichtransitional justice concepts have found legal expression, especially through human rights law and jurisprudence, and international criminal law. These essays shed light on some of the difficult choices encountered in the design of transitional justice: criminal trials vs. amnesties, or truthcommissions; domestic or international processes; peace and reconciliation vs. accountability and punishment. Transitional justice is considered not only in relation to political events and legal developments, but also in relation to the broader social and cultural tendencies of our times.

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Among the most prominent and significant political and legal developments since the end of the Cold War is the proliferation of mechanisms for addressing the complex challenges of transition from authoritarian rule to human rights-based democratic constitutionalism, particularly with regardsto the demands for accountability in relation...

Ruti G. Teitel is the Ernst C. Stiefel Professor of Comparative Law at New York Law School. She is recognized as an authority on transitional justice, not only by legal academics and practitioners, but also by those addressing these issues in the fields of political science, public policy, sociology, and philosophy. Professor Teitel h...

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Transitional Justice
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Format:PaperbackDimensions:258 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:December 15, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0190221372

ISBN - 13:9780190221379

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Table of Contents

IntroductionPart I: Overview1. Transitional Justice GlobalizedPart II: Roots2. The Universal and the Particular in International Criminal Justice3. Transitional Justice: Postwar Legacies (Symposium: The Nuremberg Trials: A Reappraisal and Their Legacy)Part III: Narratives4. Transitional Justice Genealogy5. Bringing the Messiah Through the Law6. Transitional Justice as Liberal NarrativePart IV: Conflict, Transition and the Rule of Law7. The Law and Politics of Contemporary Transitional Justice8. Rethinking Jus Post Bellum in an Age of Global Transitional Justice: Engaging with Michael Walzer and Larry May, Symposium Issue on Just and Unjust Wars9. Transitional Rule of Law10. The Alien Tort and Global Rule of Law11. Transitional Justice and the Transformation of ConstitutionalismEpilogueIndex

Editorial Reviews

"This volume encompasses her essays on transitional justice over the course of a decade, offering insights into the development both of her thought and the field itself. As such, it is essential reading for those who seek to understand the rise to prominence, and shifting meanings, oftransitional justice in contemporary human rights discourse and practice." --Chandra Lekha Sriram, Professor of International Law and International Relations, Co-Director of the Centre on Human Rights in Conflict, University of East London, Global Policy Journal