God In La Mancha: Religious Reform And The People Of Cuenca, 1500–1650 by Sara T. NalleGod In La Mancha: Religious Reform And The People Of Cuenca, 1500–1650 by Sara T. Nalle

God In La Mancha: Religious Reform And The People Of Cuenca, 1500–1650

bySara T. Nalle

Paperback | April 30, 2008

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"Until the middle of the seventeenth century, when complacency got the better of the good intentions of the 1560s, the Counter-Reformation triumphed in Spain. In this process, Nalle shows in her thorough study, persuasion was more effective than coercion. The Inquisition served as a means of spreading the Tridentine doctrine, and of registering the good results, rather than as an instrument of terror."- Times Literary Supplement

"Nalle succeeds in truly writing a solid cultural history. She is devoted to an understanding of the material base without being a reductionist, and is able to explore ideas without losing sight of commonalities and realities. Her book blends the best of microhistory with a certain Rankean meticulousness."- Sixteenth Century Journal

Sara T. Nalle is a professor of history at William Paterson University and the author of Mad for God: Bartolomé Sánchez, the Secret Messiah of Cardenete.
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Title:God In La Mancha: Religious Reform And The People Of Cuenca, 1500–1650Format:PaperbackDimensions:328 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:April 30, 2008Publisher:Johns Hopkins University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801888549

ISBN - 13:9780801888540

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Until the middle of the seventeenth century, when complacency got the better of the good intentions of the 1560s, the Counter-Reformation triumphed in Spain. In this process, Nalle shows in her thorough study, persuasion was more effective than coercion. The Inquisition served as a means of spreading the Tridentine doctrine, and of registering the good results, rather than as an instrument of terror.