Gods And Kings: The Rise And Fall Of Alexander Mcqueen And John Galliano

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Gods And Kings: The Rise And Fall Of Alexander Mcqueen And John Galliano

by Dana Thomas

Penguin Publishing Group | February 10, 2015 | Hardcover

Gods And Kings: The Rise And Fall Of Alexander Mcqueen And John Galliano is rated 4 out of 5 by 1.
More than two decades ago, John Galliano and Alexander McQueen arrived on the fashions scene when the business was in an artistic and economic rut. Both wanted to revolutionize fashion in a way no one had in decades. They shook the establishment out of its bourgeois, minimalist stupor with daring, sexy designs. They turned out landmark collections in mesmerizing, theatrical shows that retailers and critics still gush about and designers continue to reference.

Their approach to fashion was wildly different—Galliano began as an illustrator, McQueen as a Savile Row tailor. Galliano led the way with his sensual bias-cut gowns and his voluptuous hourglass tailoring, which he presented in romantic storybook-like settings. McQueen, though nearly ten years younger than Galliano, was a brilliant technician and a visionary artist who brought a new reality to fashion, as well as an otherworldly beauty. For his first official collection at the tender age of twenty-three, McQueen did what few in fashion ever achieve: he invented a new silhouette, the Bumster.

They had similar backgrounds: sensitive, shy gay men raised in tough London neighborhoods, their love of fashion nurtured by their doting mothers. Both struggled to get their businesses off the ground, despite early critical success. But by 1997, each had landed a job as creative director for couture houses owned by French tycoon Bernard Arnault, chairman of LVMH.
 
Galliano’s and McQueen’s work for Dior and Givenchy and beyond not only influenced fashion; their distinct styles were also reflected across the media landscape. With their help, luxury fashion evolved from a clutch of small, family-owned businesses into a $280 billion-a-year global corporate industry. Executives pushed the designers to meet increasingly rapid deadlines. For both Galliano and McQueen, the pace was unsustainable. In 2010, McQueen took his own life three weeks before his womens' wear show.

The same week that Galliano was fired, Forbes named Arnault the fourth richest man in the world. Two months later, Kate Middleton wore a McQueen wedding gown, instantly making the house the world’s most famous fashion brand, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art opened a wildly successful McQueen retrospective, cosponsored by the corporate owners of the McQueen brand. The corporations had won and the artists had lost.

In her groundbreaking work Gods and Kings, acclaimed journalist Dana Thomas tells the true story of McQueen and Galliano. In so doing, she reveals the revolution in high fashion in the last two decades—and the price it demanded of the very ones who saved it.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 432 pages, 9.56 × 6.56 × 1.31 in

Published: February 10, 2015

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1594204942

ISBN - 13: 9781594204944

Found in: Biography and Memoir

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fantastic, yet tragic, look into the lives of two design masters! I studied Fashion in college and for as long as I can remember, McQueen and Galliano have always been my two favourite designers. Late last year when I heard this book would be coming out, I was so excited and couldn't wait to pick it up because I'm always up for learning more about my two favourites. I cried and cried when I found out McQueen had committed suicide and couldn't believe my ears when reports of Galliano's anti-semitic tirades hit the news, so you can imagine how eager I was to read this book. I liked it. It read like a very long fashion magazine article. It was unbiased, the research was done well, and the book's pacing was kept steady and interesting. It was never dull, but I found it a bit rushed towards the end (maybe the last quarter of the book could have used more finessing). There were some things that really surprised me and had me doing double-takes; for instance, I never knew McQueen was HIV positive. I admired him for so many years - and still do - and yet I had no idea how ill he really was. The only negative thing I can say about this book is that it made me despise Galliano. I used to adore him, really. Now? I don't even want to hear about him. From the sounds of it, he treated most of his employees like crap and walked around like a huge primma donna. Yes, he is a top-notch designer of fashion, but apart from that, there is nothing I admire about him anymore. Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who is interested in fashion, design, and even pop culture. It was a great, engrossing read!
Date published: 2015-03-28

– More About This Product –

Gods And Kings: The Rise And Fall Of Alexander Mcqueen And John Galliano

Gods And Kings: The Rise And Fall Of Alexander Mcqueen And John Galliano

by Dana Thomas

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 432 pages, 9.56 × 6.56 × 1.31 in

Published: February 10, 2015

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1594204942

ISBN - 13: 9781594204944

Read from the Book

INTRODUCTIONOn the evening of February 24, 2011, thirty-five-year-old Géraldine Bloch, the head of exhibitions at Paris’s Institute of the Arab World, and her boyfriend, forty-one-year-old Philippe Virgitti, who worked as a receptionist, were sitting on the terrace of the Paris café La Perle, chatting over a couple of beers, when the man next to them yelled to quiet down. Realizing that he was drunk—his eyes were glassy and his speech was slurred—they brushed him off. But he kept needling them.“Your voice is annoying me,” he snarled. “You’re speaking too loudly.”The drunk man’s bodyguard, standing a few feet away, saw that the situation was quickly devolving into a fight and Bloch was getting upset. He rang his boss’s lawyer on a cell phone and tried to pass the phone to Bloch so the lawyer could calm her down, but she refused to take the call. A security guard suggested she move to another table.Before she could, the drunk man grabbed her hair and shouted, “Dirty Jew face, you should be dead.” She screamed in pain. “Shut your mouth, dirty bitch,” he snapped. “I can’t stand your dirty whore voice.”He then turned his anger toward Virgitti and yelled: “Fucking Asian bastard, I’ll kill you!” As Bloch continued to shriek, the drunk told her: “You’re so ugly. I can’t bear looking at you. You’re wearing cheap boots, cheap thigh boots. You’ve got no hair, your eyebrows are ugly, you’re ugly, you’re nothing but a whore.”Then he let her go, stood up, struck a rock star–like pose and p
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From the Publisher

More than two decades ago, John Galliano and Alexander McQueen arrived on the fashions scene when the business was in an artistic and economic rut. Both wanted to revolutionize fashion in a way no one had in decades. They shook the establishment out of its bourgeois, minimalist stupor with daring, sexy designs. They turned out landmark collections in mesmerizing, theatrical shows that retailers and critics still gush about and designers continue to reference.

Their approach to fashion was wildly different—Galliano began as an illustrator, McQueen as a Savile Row tailor. Galliano led the way with his sensual bias-cut gowns and his voluptuous hourglass tailoring, which he presented in romantic storybook-like settings. McQueen, though nearly ten years younger than Galliano, was a brilliant technician and a visionary artist who brought a new reality to fashion, as well as an otherworldly beauty. For his first official collection at the tender age of twenty-three, McQueen did what few in fashion ever achieve: he invented a new silhouette, the Bumster.

They had similar backgrounds: sensitive, shy gay men raised in tough London neighborhoods, their love of fashion nurtured by their doting mothers. Both struggled to get their businesses off the ground, despite early critical success. But by 1997, each had landed a job as creative director for couture houses owned by French tycoon Bernard Arnault, chairman of LVMH.
 
Galliano’s and McQueen’s work for Dior and Givenchy and beyond not only influenced fashion; their distinct styles were also reflected across the media landscape. With their help, luxury fashion evolved from a clutch of small, family-owned businesses into a $280 billion-a-year global corporate industry. Executives pushed the designers to meet increasingly rapid deadlines. For both Galliano and McQueen, the pace was unsustainable. In 2010, McQueen took his own life three weeks before his womens' wear show.

The same week that Galliano was fired, Forbes named Arnault the fourth richest man in the world. Two months later, Kate Middleton wore a McQueen wedding gown, instantly making the house the world’s most famous fashion brand, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art opened a wildly successful McQueen retrospective, cosponsored by the corporate owners of the McQueen brand. The corporations had won and the artists had lost.

In her groundbreaking work Gods and Kings, acclaimed journalist Dana Thomas tells the true story of McQueen and Galliano. In so doing, she reveals the revolution in high fashion in the last two decades—and the price it demanded of the very ones who saved it.

About the Author

Dana Thomas is the author of the New York Times bestseller Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster. She began her career writing for the “Style” section of The Washington Post, and for fifteen years she served as the European cultural and fashion correspondent for Newsweek in Paris. She is currently a contributing editor for T: The New York Times Style Magazine and has written for The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and the Financial Times in London. She lives in Paris.

Editorial Reviews

San Francisco Chronicle: “One of the most anticipated fashion reads of 2015 … explores the complicated minds of the two designers. From their brilliant early collections and career highs to McQueen’s tragic suicide and Galliano’s public meltdown, Thomas pays equal heed to the darkness and the light of both men in this gripping story of fashion Icaruses who flew too close to the sun.Christian Science Monitor: ”Those familiar with Thomas, author of "Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster," are well aware of her abilities to break down the illusions of the fashion industry. She believes there were several reasons that contributed to the two designers’ downfalls: the crushing pressures in the new corporatization and democratization of fashion, the use of substance abuse as a coping mechanism, and the personal loss of family and close friends.”Jon Meacham, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Thomas Jefferson and American Lion:  “Dana Thomas has written a real-life saga that is as engaging and compelling as a work of great fiction. By taking us inside the fascinating world of fashion, she gives us a startling tale of ambition, creativity, fame, and ultimately tragedy. This is a terrific book.” Michael Gross, author of Model and House of Outrageous Fortune:  “Comprehensive, detailed, coldly accurate yet extraordinarily sympathetic, Dana Thomas’s Gods and Kings is a fascinating double biography of two dressmakers of genius. But it's also a riveting, definitive history of the three decades i
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