God's Grace And Human Action: 'merit' In The Theology Of Thomas Aquinas

Paperback | February 28, 2016

byJoseph P. Wawrykow

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Offering a fresh approach to one significant aspect of the soteriology of Thomas Aquinas, God’s Grace and Human Action brings important scholarship and insight to the issue of merit in Aquinas’s theology. Through a careful historical analysis, Joseph P. Wawrykow delineates the precise function of merit in Aquinas's account of salvation, revealing that the attainment of salvation through merit testifies not only to the dignity of the human person but even more to the goodness of God.

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Offering a fresh approach to one significant aspect of the soteriology of Thomas Aquinas, God’s Grace and Human Action brings important scholarship and insight to the issue of merit in Aquinas’s theology. Through a careful historical analysis, Joseph P. Wawrykow delineates the precise function of merit in Aquinas's account of salvation...

Joseph P. Wawrykow teaches medieval theology at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of The Westminster Handbook to Thomas Aquinas (2005), and co-editor of Christ Among the Medieval Dominicans (1998) and The Theology of Thomas Aquinas (2005).

other books by Joseph P. Wawrykow

God's Grace and Human Action: Merit' in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas
God's Grace and Human Action: Merit' in the Theology of...

Kobo ebook|Feb 1 2016

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:392 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.9 inPublished:February 28, 2016Publisher:University Of Notre Dame PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0268044333

ISBN - 13:9780268044336

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“There is much to be learned from this very intelligent book. The author’s insistence on the evidence for development in Thomas’s understanding, his broad reading, his alertness to the interconnectedness of Thomas’s ideas, and his willingness to grapple with the details of a text all combine to yield a wealth of insights. Wawrykow has gone a long way toward recovering the ‘essential spirit’ of Thomas’s notion of merit, and any serious discussion of the doctrine of merit or of Thomas’s theology of grace will have to come to terms with his achievement.”