Good Government? Good Citizens?: Courts, Politics, and Markets in a Changing Canada by W.A. BogartGood Government? Good Citizens?: Courts, Politics, and Markets in a Changing Canada by W.A. Bogart

Good Government? Good Citizens?: Courts, Politics, and Markets in a Changing Canada

byW.A. Bogart

Paperback | January 1, 2006

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Good Government? Good Citizens? explores the evolving concept of the citizen in Canada at the beginning of this century. Three forces are at work in reconstituting the citizen in this society: courts, politics, and markets. Many see these forces as intersecting and colliding in ways that are fundamentally reshaping the relationship of individuals to the state and to each other.

How has Canadian society actually been transformed? Is the state truly in retreat? Do individuals, in fact, have a fundamentally altered sense of their relationship to government and to each other? Have courts and markets supplanted representative politics regarding the expression of basic values? Must judicialized protection of human rights and minority interests necessarily mean a diminished concern for the common good on the part of representative politics? To what extent should markets and representative politics maintain a role in the protection of human rights and minority interests? Will representative politics ever hold the public trust again?

Good Government? Good Citizens? responds to these questions. It does so by examining the altered roles of courts, politics, and markets over the last two decades. It then examines a number of areas to gauge the extent of the evidence regarding transformations that have occurred because of these changing roles. There are chapters on the First Peoples, cyberspace, education, and on an ageing Canada. The book concludes with reflections on the “good citizen” at the dawning of the new century.

Of particular interest to professors and students of law and political science, Good Government? Good Citizens? will appeal to anyone interested in the changing face of Canada and its citizens.

W.A. Bogart teaches in the Faculty of Law at the University of Windsor. He has been a Virtual Scholar in Residence for the Law Commission of Canada, and is the author of several books, including Consequences: The Impact of Law and Its Complexity and Courts and Country: The Limits of Litigation and the Social and Political Life of Canad...
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Title:Good Government? Good Citizens?: Courts, Politics, and Markets in a Changing CanadaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 8.97 × 5.99 × 0.72 inPublished:January 1, 2006Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:077481165X

ISBN - 13:9780774811651

Reviews

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part 1: The Society that Was

1 Before the Transformation

Part 2: Courts, Politics, and Markets in a Society in Transition

2 The Ascendance of Courts

3 Representative Politics in Disarray

4 Chasing Choice: The Market Abounding

Part 3: Some Examples of a Changing Canada

5 Aboriginals: Two Row Wampum, Second Thoughts, and Citizens Plus

6 Citizens in Cyberspace: The Internet and Canadian Democracy

7 The Youngest Citizens and Education as a Public Good?

8 Evermore Citizens Who Are Senior: An Ageing Canada Conclusion: "The Dance of Adjustment"

Notes

Index

Editorial Reviews

Three forces are at work in reconstituting the citizen in this society: courts, politics, and markets. Many see these forces as intersecting and colliding in ways that are fundamentally reshaping the relationship of individuals to the state and to each other. How has Canadian society actually been transformed? Good Government? Good Citizens? examines the altered roles of courts, politics, and markets over the last two decades. It includes chapters on the Aboriginal peoples, cyberspace, education, and on an ageing Canada. The book concludes with reflections on the “good citizen.”This remarkably thorough and wide-ranging book charts, frequently in exquisite detail, an array of important changes in Canada’s society, economy and polity. Notwithstanding this breadth, it has a clear central concern: Canadians’ loss of trust and confidence in representative government and the related rise of courts and markets as the institutions in which fundamental choices are made ... For Bogart, this message is ethically and politically troubling ... - Damian Collins, Ph.D Simon Fraser University, 2006