Government Information: Education And Research, 1928-1986

Hardcover | January 1, 1987

byJohn Richardson

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"As one of the most capable contemporary library school faculty members with an interest in government documents, John Richardson . . . offers fascinating work of general interest that examines the educational research relating to documents in library education over an extended period of time." Wilson Library Bulletin "There is no question of the importance of this book, both for the status of government information research and for ranking research on schools that are emphasizing this aspect of library and information science." RQ

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"As one of the most capable contemporary library school faculty members with an interest in government documents, John Richardson . . . offers fascinating work of general interest that examines the educational research relating to documents in library education over an extended period of time." Wilson Library Bulletin "There is no ques...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:203 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:January 1, 1987Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313256055

ISBN - 13:9780313256059

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?Richardson surveys master and doctoral studies accepted by North American schools of library and information science that treat government information and publishing and on the servicing of government publications in libraries. He supplies a six-part listing of 317 annotated citations arranged by level of government (local, state, federal, foreign, UN, comparative) and in reverse chronological order. Nearly two thirds of the studies deal with the federal government. An analysis of the characteristic features of this research and changing patterns over time is presented, identifying types of methodology employed, the major sponsoring institutions, and key faculty advisers (including Richardson himself). Other factors examined include subsequent publication and citation, and gender as it correlates with the adviser's possession of the doctorate or the student's pursuing graduate studies at the doctoral level. Richardson offers some suggestions for encouraging quality research in the field of government information, e.g., the development of a program of grants and prizes by the American library Association's Government Documents Round Table. Graduate collections and libraries with significant public documents holdings.?-Choice