Grammatical Categories and Cognition: A Case Study of the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis by John A. LucyGrammatical Categories and Cognition: A Case Study of the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis by John A. Lucy

Grammatical Categories and Cognition: A Case Study of the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis

byJohn A. LucyEditorJudith Irvine

Paperback | June 28, 1996

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John Lucy uses original, empirical data to examine the Sapir-Whorf linguistic relativity hypothesis: the proposal that the grammar of the particular language that we speak affects the way we think about reality. The author compares the grammar of American English with that of the Yucatec Maya, an indigenous language spoken in Southeastern Mexico, focusing on differences in the number marking patterns of the two languages. He then identifies distinctive patterns of thought relating to these differences by means of a systematic assessment of memory and classification preferences among speakers of both languages.
Title:Grammatical Categories and Cognition: A Case Study of the Linguistic Relativity HypothesisFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:228 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inShipping dimensions:8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:June 28, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521566207

ISBN - 13:9780521566209

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Table of Contents

List of figures; List of tables; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Background of the comparative research in Yucatan, Mexico; 2. Comparison of grammatical categories: nominal number in English and Yucatec; 3. Cognitive assessment; 4. Conclusions; Appendices; Notes; References; Index.

From Our Editors

In this book, the author compares the grammar of American English with that of Yucatec Maya, an indigenous language spoken in southeastern Mexico, focusing on differences in the number marking patterns of the two languages.

Editorial Reviews

"The overall achievement of Lucy's studies is very high....In sum, Lucy's experiments are the best support for the Whorfian hypothesis to date, because they concern a central aspect of language meaning, cover a variety of cognitive tasks, and have many methodological strengths." J. Peter Denny, Anthropological Linguistics