Great Power and Great Responsibility: The Philosophical Politics of Comics by Douglas MannGreat Power and Great Responsibility: The Philosophical Politics of Comics by Douglas Mann

Great Power and Great Responsibility: The Philosophical Politics of Comics

byDouglas Mann

Paperback | December 30, 2014

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Great Power and Great Responsibility is a thought-provoking collection of essays that delves into the philosophies that underlie many of the great comic series. From Watchmen to Bomb Queen, Douglas Mann considers a wide variety of comic storylines and characters, as well as the culture that both creates and enjoys them. A fascinating and unusual look at two pieces of society that do not generally appear on the same page.

Douglas Mann is an adjunct professor at King's University College and the University of Western Ontario. He is the author of three previous books, including Understanding Society: A Survey of Modern Social Theory.
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Title:Great Power and Great Responsibility: The Philosophical Politics of ComicsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:436 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.03 inPublished:December 30, 2014Publisher:Wolsak and Wynn Publishers Ltd.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1894987799

ISBN - 13:9781894987790

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Table of Contents

1. An Introduction to Comic Books

2. To Compromise or Not to Compromise, That is the Question: Watchmen as Ethical and Political Dialogue

3. Secret Societies and Better Worlds in Planetary

4. Civil War and the Right to Revolt

5. A Primordial Rumble in the Comic Book Jungle: Sheena Rehabilitated

6. It?s Fun to Blow Stuff Up! Bomb Queen as a Satire on American Foreign Policy

7. The Post-Ideological Hero: Comic Books Go to Hollywood

8. The Phenomenology of Geek Culture

Editorial Reviews

"All in all, Great Power and Great Responsibility is really a book that has something for everyone, no matter the reader?s familiarity with comics. If someone has never read a comic book before, it goes into how to read comics. For those who are comic book fans, it explores themes that you?ll find in various comic book series." - Once Upon A Bookshelf "Make no mistake, Mann takes these comics seriously, and it?s why I find this read so compelling. A cynical mind could reduce Civil War to Mark Millar and Steve McNiven destructively toying with action figures, but Mann gives the social debate a heft I didn?t know it could take on. In his essay, ?Civil War and the Right to Revolt,? Mann aligns Captain America and Iron Man with historic philosophies, and examines how those insights inform the decisions of the story." - Comic Book Herald