Great Powers and Outlaw States: Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal Order by Gerry SimpsonGreat Powers and Outlaw States: Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal Order by Gerry Simpson

Great Powers and Outlaw States: Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal Order

byGerry Simpson

Paperback | May 24, 2004

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From the Congress of Vienna to the "war on terrorism", the roles of "great powers and outlaw states" have had a major impact on international relations. Gerry Simpson describes the ways in which an international legal order based on "sovereign equality" has accommodated the great powers and regulated outlaw states since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Simpson also offers a way of understanding recent transformations in the global political order by recalling the lessons of the past--in particular, through the recent violent conflicts in Kosovo and Afghanistan.
Gerry Simpson is a Senior Lecturer in the Law Department at the London School of Economics where he teaches Public International Law and International Criminal Law. He has been a Legal Adviser to the Australian Government on international criminal law and was part of the Australian delegation at the Rome Conference in 1998 to establish...
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Title:Great Powers and Outlaw States: Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal OrderFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:416 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.94 inShipping dimensions:8.98 × 5.98 × 0.94 inPublished:May 24, 2004Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521534909

ISBN - 13:9780521534901

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Table of Contents

Foreword Professor James Crawford; Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introduction: 1. Great powers and outlaw states; Part II. Concepts: 2. Sovereign equalities; 3. Legalised hierarchies; Part III. Histories: Great Powers: 4. Legalised hegemony: Vienna to The Hague 1815-1906; 5. 'Extreme equality': rupture at The Hague 1907; 6. The great powers, sovereign equality and the making of the UN charter: San Francisco 1945; 7. Holy alliances: Verona 1818 and Kosovo 1999; Part IV. Histories: Outlaw States: 8. Unequal sovereigns 1815-1839; 9. Peace-loving nations: 1945; 10. Outlaw states: 1999; Part V. Conclusion: 11. Arguing about Afghanistan: great powers and outlaw states redux; 12. The puzzle of sovereignty.

Editorial Reviews

'The book contains refreshing and sometimes provoking thoughts and it is of interest for students and scholars well beyond the circle of international law.' Journal of Peace Research