Greek Epigram in the Roman Empire: Martials Forgotten Rivals

Hardcover | May 26, 2004

byGideon Nisbet

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Satirical, or 'skoptic', epigram emerged as a distinctive new sub-genre of Greek literature in the Roman empire (the mid-first century CE) and flourished for at least a century. It was imitated by Martial, but it is now rarely read. In this book, the first substantial treatment of the subject,Gideon Nisbet rehabilitates skoptic epigram, introduces its authors, gives an account of its development, and situates it within its cultural context. He also suggests striking new ways of reading ancient epigram and examines satire's engagement with gender, identity, and power.

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Satirical, or 'skoptic', epigram emerged as a distinctive new sub-genre of Greek literature in the Roman empire (the mid-first century CE) and flourished for at least a century. It was imitated by Martial, but it is now rarely read. In this book, the first substantial treatment of the subject,Gideon Nisbet rehabilitates skoptic epigram...

Gideon Nisbet is Lecturer in Classics, St John's College, Oxford

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.82 inPublished:May 26, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019926337X

ISBN - 13:9780199263370

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Table of Contents

Preface: skoptic epigram1. Reading skoptic epigram2. Situating skoptic epigram3. Louklillios4. Nikarkhos5. Broken masks: skoptic epigram's identity crisis6. Political epigram: Louklillios and Nero7. Ammianos8. Loukianos9. Skoptic Oddments10. Conclusion