Greek Philosophy

Paperback | October 14, 1991

EditorReginald E. Allen

not yet rated|write a review
Widely praised for its accessibility and its concentration on the metaphysical issues that are most central to the history of Greek philosophy, Greek Philosophy: Thales to Aristotle offers a valuable introduction to the works of the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle.
For the Third Edition, Professor Allen has provided new translations of Socrates' speech in the Symposium and of the first five chapters of Aristotle's Categories, as well as new selections bearing on Aristotle's Theory of Infinity, Continuity, and Discreteness. The book also contains a general introduction which sets forth Professor Allen's distinctive and now widely accepted interpretation of the development of Greek philosophy and science, along with selective bibliography, and lists of suggested readings.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$21.99

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Widely praised for its accessibility and its concentration on the metaphysical issues that are most central to the history of Greek philosophy, Greek Philosophy: Thales to Aristotle offers a valuable introduction to the works of the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. For the Third Edition, Professor Allen has provided new translation...

Reginald E. Allen is professor of classics and philosophy at Northwestern University. He is the author of Plato's Parmenides: Translation and Analysis, Socrates and Legal Obligation, and Plato's Symposium.

other books by Reginald E. Allen

Format:PaperbackDimensions:446 pages, 8.25 × 5.38 × 1.2 inPublished:October 14, 1991Publisher:Free Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0029004950

ISBN - 13:9780029004951

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Greek Philosophy

Reviews

Extra Content

Read from the Book

Chapter ITHE SOURCESNo work of the Presocratics has come down in its entirety. We possess fragments preserved by later authors, and testimony. The major sources are as follows:A. Philosophers(i) Plato gives useful information about his predecessors. Since he himself was not a historian of philosophy, his remarks must be treated with caution.(ii) Aristotle surveyed his predecessors' testimony on the philosophical problems with which he himself was concerned. The Presocratics are thus made parties to his argument, not left to speak for themselves, and this often introduces a cast into his interpretation. Nevertheless, he was not without a sense of history, and his work is, and will remain a major source of knowledge.(iii) The Stoics' method of interpretation was syncretistic: they undertook to show that their predecessors agreed with Stoic doctrine, and with each other.(iv) Sceptics, such as Sextus Empiricus, were concerned to exhibit the contradictions of earlier philosophy, but preserved valuable fragments.(v) The Neo-Platonists, especially Proclus, Alexander, and Simplicius, commented on Plato and Aristotle; with the library of the Academy at their disposal, they too preserved many fragments.B. The Doxographical TraditionTheophrastus, Aristotle's successor in the Lyceum, continued the Peripatetic interest in history. As part of the encyclopedia of knowledge projected by the school, Theophrastus wrote On the Opinions of the Physical Philosophers, parts of which have come down to us. He consulted the original texts of the Presocratics, but his historical judgment was much influenced by Aristotle.Theophrastus' work became the standard authority in the ancient world. The doxographers are those who derive their material, directly or indirectly, from the Opinions (doxai). The main sources in the doxographical tradition are Diogenes Laertius (probably third century A.D.), Plutarch (first-second century A.D.), and John Stobeaus (fifth century A.D.).Copyright © 1966, 1985, 1991 by Reginald E. Allen

Table of Contents


CONTENTS

PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION

INTRODUCTION

PRESOCRATIC PHILOSOPHY

TRANSLATED BY G. S. KIRK AND J. E. RAVEN

I. The Sources

II. The Milesians

III. Pythagoras and Pythagoreanism

IV. Heraclitus

V. The Eleatics

VI. The Pluralists

PLATO

VII. Euthyphro

TRANSLATED BY R. E. ALLEN

VIII. Apology

TRANSLATED BY R. E. ALLEN

IX. Crito

TRANSLATED BY R. E. ALLEN

X. Meno

TRANSLATED BY W. K. C. GUTHRIE

XI. The Speech of Socrates in the Symposium (in part)

TRANSLATED BY R. E. ALLEN

XII. Phaedo (in part)

TRANSLATED BY R. HACKFORTH

XIII. Republic (in part)

TRANSLATED BY F. M. CORNFORD

XIV. Phaedrus (in part)

TRANSLATED BY R. HACKFORTH

XV. Parmenides (in part)

TRANSLATED BY R. E. ALLEN

XVI. Timaeus (in part)

TRANSLATED BY F. M. CORNFORD

ARISTOTLE

XVII. Categories (in part)

TRANSLATED BY R. E. ALLEN

XVIII. On the Soul (in part)

TRANSLATED BY W. S. HETT

XIX. Metaphysics (in part)

TRANSLATED BY HUGH TREDENNICK

XX. Nicomachean Ethics (in part)

TRANSLATED BY H. RACKHAM

XXI. Politics (in part)

TRANSLATED BY H. RACKHAM

XXII. Physics (in part)

TRANSLATED BY F. M. CORNFORD AND P. WICKSTEED

SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX