Groundwater: The Art, Design And Science Of A Dry River by Ellen McmahonGroundwater: The Art, Design And Science Of A Dry River by Ellen Mcmahon

Groundwater: The Art, Design And Science Of A Dry River

EditorEllen Mcmahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein

Hardcover | January 15, 2013

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Groundwater brings together a diverse community of artists, designers, and scientists interested in understanding and raising public awareness about local water and its relationship to global climate. This engaging collection of photographs, graphic design, architectural drawings, artist books, essays, and poems by University of Arizona faculty and students is an ode to the dry rivers of Tucson, Arizona. Poems and essays by Nathaniel Brodie, Alison Deming, Allison Dushane, Gregg Garfin, Ander Monson, Logan Phillips, and Paul Robbins provide poetic perspectives on the Rillito River; an overview of the region’s climate, hydrology, and water policy; a comparison between the theory and practice of interdisciplinary research; and a trail of the overlapping roles of science and art in the construction of contemporary concepts of nature from the Romantic period to the present.

Art and design projects include intercontinental comparisons of arid regions and river systems, finely detailed drawings and photographic series reflecting direct encounters with the local landscape, and collaborations with the Rillito River Project. One scientist in the project describes the ability of these creative projects to “transform messages from the stilted language of scientific literature into rich, multifaceted vocabularies that can be grasped by those interested, but inexpert, in the subject matter.” Turning the desecrated and overlooked dry rivers of Tucson into muse and inspiration, this project speaks volumes about community, creativity, and responsibility. 

Groundwater is a work of art in itself, beautifully designed and produced with lush color reproductions, letterpress printed covers and open-sewn binding.
Ellen McMahon is a Fulbright Scholar and University of Arizona professor of Art and Visual Communications. Her interest in combining the perspectives and methods of artists, designers, and scientists has led her into several collaborative projects focusing on environmental issues. Ander Monson is the author of a number of paraphernali...
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Title:Groundwater: The Art, Design And Science Of A Dry RiverFormat:HardcoverDimensions:112 pages, 9 × 9 × 0.7 inPublished:January 15, 2013Publisher:Confluencenter for Creative InquiryLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0816530238

ISBN - 13:9780816530236

Reviews

Table of Contents

Selected Contents
Rillito | Alison Hawthorne Deming
Dry City River | Nathaniel Brodie
Rillito River Project | Ellen Benjoya Skotheim, John Newman, Jennifer Powers-Murphy
waterBar | Nicole Sweeney
Confluence of Boundaries | Jennifer Heinfeld
What's So Important About Water? | Jessica Gerlach
Canto Rillito (With Bats Under Bridges) | Logan Phillips
Desert Water: Paradoxes and Trade-Offs | Gregg Garfin
REF, YOOS River | John Gialanella
Expedition | Camden Hardy
Sweetwater Journal | Robert Long
Imagination and Invention: Romanticism and the Life of a Dry River | Allison Dushane
Sweetwater Wetlands, 2010 | Daniel Cheek
Talking through Objects: Multidisciplinary Dialogues with "Things" | Paul Robbins
Climatic Landscaped Habitat | Jongwoo Kim
The Nile and Colorado Rivers | Danielle Alvarez
Tucson's Water Future | Jeff Leinenveber
Tucson + Production | Mathew Propst
Industrial Receptacles | Sulaiman Alothman
I in River | Ander Monson
Past Year's Data/Future Archive 2010-11 | Christiana Caro

Editorial Reviews

“It seems an object of art before you even turn a page. Hopefully this is the direction in which bookmaking is headed in the digital age, toward the small-batch and the quirky—something worthy of being called a genuine artifact.”
   — Tim Hull, Tucson Weekly