Grub Street and the Ivory Tower: Literary Journalism and Literary Scholarship from Fielding to the…

Paperback | October 1, 1998

EditorBridget Bennett, Jeremy Treglown

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Literary criticism has been called a story of reading. In what conditions have the best critical stories been told? From Jenny Uglow's account of literary journalism in the world of Henry Fielding to Marjorie Perloff's praise for the impact of the Internet on poetry publishing and reviewing,Grub Street and the Ivory Tower gives lively case-histories of the commercial and institutional contexts of writing about writing, with an emphasis on the vexed but at best mutually beneficial relationship between journalism and literary scholarship. Topics include the traffic between universities and the wider literary world in the `long' nineteenth century; the role of Blackwood's Magazine in the First World War; Virginia Woolf's work as a literary journalist; the early days of the London Review of Books; and the contested terrain of bookreviewing in contemporary Ireland. Most of the contributors are scholars who also command a non-academic readership, as reviewers and otherwise: among them Valentine Cunningham, Hermione Lee, Karl Miller, Lorna Sage, and John Sutherland.

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Literary criticism has been called a story of reading. In what conditions have the best critical stories been told? From Jenny Uglow's account of literary journalism in the world of Henry Fielding to Marjorie Perloff's praise for the impact of the Internet on poetry publishing and reviewing,Grub Street and the Ivory Tower gives lively ...

Treglown is a former editor of the Times Literary Supplement

other books by Bridget Bennett

Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 8.43 × 5.43 × 0.67 inPublished:October 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198184123

ISBN - 13:9780198184126

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Table of Contents

IntroductionJenny Uglow: Fielding, Grub Street, and Canary WharfZachary Leader: Coleridge and the Uses of JournalismGrevel Lindop: De Quincey and the Edinburgh and Glasgow University CirclesJohn Sutherland: Journalism, Scholarship, and the University College London English DepartmentValentine Cunningham: Darke conceits: Churton Collins, Edmund Gosse, and the Professions of CriticismDavid Finkelstein: Literature, Propaganda, and the First World War: The Case of Blackwood's MagazineHermione Lee: `Crimes of Criticism': Virginia Woolf and Literary JournalismJeremy Treglown: The TLS and the Second World War, and How to Fill Some Gaps in Modern British Cultural HistoryStefan Collini: The Critic as Anti-Journalist: Leavis after ScrutinyJohn Stokes: Saving Lives: Kenneth Tynan and the Duties of Dramatic CriticismEdna Longley: `Between the Saxon Smile and the Yankee Yawp': Problems and Contexts of Literary Reviewing in IrelandMarjorie Perloff: What We Don't Talk About When We Talk About Poetry: Some Aporias of Literary JournalismKarl Miller: Teachers, WritersLorna Sage: Living on WritingNotes on ContributorsIndex

Editorial Reviews

A Rich seam of essays - Tim Dee - THES 16/07/99