Guidebook to the Homeobox Genes

Paperback | January 1, 1989

EditorDenis Duboule

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A unique source of reference to the most up-to-date information available on the homeobox genesSummarizes and draws together the widely scattered and very confusing literature on these genesProviding the necessary information to allow research professionals maintain an overview and find the detailed information they require, this book is an essential guide to the rapidly increasing pool of information on homeobox genes. A brief history of the discovery of the homeobox and of its rolein development introduces the book. Organised alphabetically, it summarizes the essential features of the genes, giving key references for further reading. The easy-to- use format provides a quick and simple way to learn about the essentials of each gene.

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From the Publisher

A unique source of reference to the most up-to-date information available on the homeobox genesSummarizes and draws together the widely scattered and very confusing literature on these genesProviding the necessary information to allow research professionals maintain an overview and find the detailed information they require, this book ...

After August 1993: Professor of Biology, Department of Zoology, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Format:PaperbackDimensions:292 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.01 inPublished:January 1, 1989Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198599404

ISBN - 13:9780198599401

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Table of Contents

Denis Duboule: Preface1. Walter Gehring: A history of the homeobox2. Eddy De Robertis: The homeobox in cell differentiation and evolution3. Thomas Burgin: A comprehensive classification of homeobox genesShort descriptions of each homeobox geneReferences

Editorial Reviews

`Researchers actively working on homebox genes will certainly find this an invaluable reference source.'Peter Holland, Biologist (1995) 43 (3)