Guilt by Descent: Moral Inheritance and Decision Making in Greek Tragedy by N. J. Sewell-RutterGuilt by Descent: Moral Inheritance and Decision Making in Greek Tragedy by N. J. Sewell-Rutter

Guilt by Descent: Moral Inheritance and Decision Making in Greek Tragedy

byN. J. Sewell-Rutter

Paperback | July 29, 2010

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Blighted and accursed families are an inescapable feature of Greek tragedy, and many scholars have treated questions of inherited guilt, curses, and divine causation. N.J. Sewell-Rutter gives these familiar issues a fresh appraisal, arguing that tragedy is a medium that fuses the conceptualwith the provoking and exciting of emotion, neither of which can be ignored if the texts are to be fully understood. He pays particular attention to Aeschylus' Seven against Thebes and the Phoenician Women of Euripides, both of which dramatize the sorrows of the later generations of the House ofOedipus, but in very different, and perhaps complementary, ways. All Greek quotations are translated, making his study thoroughly accessible to the non-specialist reader.
N. J. Sewell-Rutter was Previously Lecturer in Greek at Corpus Christi College, Oxford.
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Title:Guilt by Descent: Moral Inheritance and Decision Making in Greek TragedyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0 inPublished:July 29, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199591334

ISBN - 13:9780199591336

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Preliminary studies: the supernatural and causation in Herodotus2. Inherited guilt3. Curses4. Erinyes5. Irruption and insight? The intangible burden of the supernatural in Sophocles' Labdacid plays and `Electra'6. Fate, freedom, decision making: Eteocles and othersConclusion

Editorial Reviews

Review from previous edition "...stimulating and successful...The author's approach to the texts is sound and his arguments lucidly developed. ...a relevant contribution to the studies on tragic concepts about moral inheritance, and will be useful both to students of Greek tragedy and toscholars interested in broader religious and philosophic questions." --Enrico Medda BMCR