Harm to Self

Paperback | March 1, 1989

byJoel Feinberg

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This is the third volume of Joel Feinberg's highly regarded The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, a four-volume series in which Feinberg skillfully addresses a complex question: What kinds of conduct may the state make criminal without infringing on the moral autonomy of individual citizens?In Harm to Self, Feinberg offers insightful commentary into various notions attached to self-inflicted harm, covering such topics as legal paternalism, personal sovereignty and its boundaries, voluntariness and assumptions of risk, consent and its counterfeits, coercive force, incapacity, and choiceof death.

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This is the third volume of Joel Feinberg's highly regarded The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, a four-volume series in which Feinberg skillfully addresses a complex question: What kinds of conduct may the state make criminal without infringing on the moral autonomy of individual citizens?In Harm to Self, Feinberg offers insightful c...

Joel Feinberg is at University of Arizona, Tucson.

other books by Joel Feinberg

Harmless Wrongdoing
Harmless Wrongdoing

Kobo ebook|Jul 5 1984

$50.09 online$64.99list price(save 22%)
Harm to Others
Harm to Others

Kobo ebook|Jul 5 1984

$64.99

see all books by Joel Feinberg
Format:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 9.25 × 6.14 × 0.94 inPublished:March 1, 1989Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195059239

ISBN - 13:9780195059236

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"Because of his focus on the moral limits of the criminal law, Feinberg develops, with characteristic subtlety and illumination, an account of what he calls failures of consent in two-party cases: when does the consent on the part of the party harmed to the action of another harming him or herfail to make the other's action legally permissible and so justify criminal prohibitions of the other's harmful conduct?....[A] first-rate work...of moral philosophy...contain[s] richly detailed and illuminating discussions of a host of issues concerning paternalism and deserve[s] [a] centralplace...in the contemporary debate over it."--Ethics