Hatchepsut: The Female Pharoah

Paperback | July 1, 1998

byJoyce A. Tyldesley

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Egypt?s Queen?or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King?Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 b.c.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the most beautiful structures in the world?the Deir el-Bahri temple at Luxor. After her death, however, her name and image were viciously attacked, her monuments destroyed or usurped, her place in history systematically obliterated. At last, in this dazzling work of archaeological and historical sleuthing, Joyce Tyldesley rescues this intriguing figure from more than two thousand years of oblivion and finally restores the female pharaoh to her rightful prominence as the first woman in recorded history to rule a nation.

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From Our Editors

The forgotten pharaoh -- brilliant, defiant, statesmanlike, and a womanEgypt's Queen -- or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King -- Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 B.C.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stab...

From the Publisher

Egypt?s Queen?or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King?Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 b.c.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the ...

Joyce Tyldesley, holder of a doctorate from Oxford University, is Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics, and Oriental Studies at Liverpool University, England. She is the author of Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh and Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Eygpt.

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Format:PaperbackPublished:July 1, 1998Publisher:Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140244646

ISBN - 13:9780140244649

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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Customer Reviews of Hatchepsut: The Female Pharoah

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hatchepsut This is a very sagacious account of the life of one of the most controversial Pharaohs in Ancient Egyptian history. The book starts with an examination of the times that Hatchepsut lived in, before examining her family and then her life and reign. It is very well written, giving a level-headed account of Hatchepsut's life, without going to extremes. I would recommend this book to the general reader, as well as Egyptology experts.
Date published: 1999-06-12

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction
1. Backdrop: Egypt in the Early Eighteenth Dynasty
2. A Strong Family: The Tuthmosides
3. Queen of Egypt
4. King of Egypt
5. War and Peace
6. Propaganda in Stone
7. Senenmut: Greatest of the Great
8. The End and the Aftermath

Notes
Further Reading
Index

Plates

1. The Temple of Amen at Karnak. (Werner Foreman Archive)
2. The Valley of the Kings.
3. Hatchepsut as king offering before the barque of Amen. (Block from the Chapelle Rouge, Open-Air Museum, Karnak)
4. The God Amen. (Cairo Museum garden)
5. Seated statue of Hatchepsut from Djeser-Djeseru showing the king with a female body and male accessories. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund and Edward Harkness Gift, 1929 [29.3.2])
6. The near-identical figures for King Hatchepsut and King Tuthmosis III, Hatchepsut in front. (Block from the Chapelle Rouge, Open-Air Museum, Karnak)
7. Scene showing the gods crowning King Hatchepsut, which had been attacked in antiquity.
8. Head of Hatchepsut. (Cairo Museum)
9. Granite statue of Hatchepsut. (Open-Air Museum, Karnak)
10. Red granite sphinx of Hatchepsut. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1931 [31.3.166])
11. The standing obelisk of Hatchepsut at the heart of the Temple of Amen, Karnak. (Werner Foreman Archive)
12. a) and b) Djeser-Djeseru.
13. Senenmut and the Princess Neferure. (Cairo Museum and British Museum)
14. Senenmut and Neferure.(Cairo Museum)
15. Osiride head of Hatchepsut. (Cairo Museum)
16. The carefully erased image of Hatchepsut. (Temple of Amen, Karnak)
17. Tuthmosis III. (Luxor Museum)

Figures

CHAPTER 1
1.1 The cartouche of King Sekenenre Tao II
1.2 The cartouche of King Kamose
1.3 The cartouche of King Ahmose
1.4 Old and New Kingdom soldiers (after Wilkinson, J. G., 1853, The Ancient Egyptians: their life and customs, London, Figs. 297, 300)
1.5 The god Amen (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 94)
1.6 The goddess Mut (after Seton-Williams, V. and Stocks, P., 1983, Blue Guide, Egypt, London and New York, p.48)

CHAPTER 2
2.1 King Ahmose and his grandmother, Queen Tetisheri (after Ayrton, E.R., Currelly, C.T. and Weigall, A.E.P, 1903, Abydos III, London, Plate LII)
2.2 The god Osiris (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 106)
2.3 The god Horus (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 108)
2.4 The cartouche of King Amenhotep I
2.5 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis I

CHAPTER 3
3.1 The infant Hatchepsut being suckled by the goddess Hathor (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate LIII)
3.2 A hippopotamus hunter (after Wilkinson, J. G., 1853, The Ancient Egyptians: their life and customs, London, Fig. 253)
3.3 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis II
3.4 Tuthmosis II (after Naville, E., 1906, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 5, London, Plate CXXXV)
3.5 Plan of Hatchepsut's first tomb (after Carter, H., 1917, A Tomb prepared for Queen Hatshepsuit and other recent discoveries at Thebes, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 4, Plate 20)

CHAPTER 4
4.1 The cartouche of King Maatkare Hatchepsut
4.2 The pregnant Queen Ahmose is led to the birthing bower (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate XLIX)
4.3 The infant Hatchepsut in the arms of a divine nurse (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate LIII)
4.4 Hatchepsut and Amen on a block from the Chapelle Rouge
4.5 Plan of Hatchepsut's king's tomb (after Davis, T M., ed., 1906, The Tomb of Hatshopsitu, London, Plate 8)
4.6 The goddess Isis from the sarcophagus of Hatchepsut

CHAPTER 5
5.1 Hatchepsut as a man (after Naville, E., 1908, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 6, London, Plate CLVII)
5.2 Tree being transported from Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXIV)
5.3 House on stilts, Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXIX)
5.4 The obese queen of Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXIX)
5.5 Ape from Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXVI)
5.6 Tuthmosis III offers before the barque of Amen (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXXII)

CHAPTER 6
6.1 Plan of the Speos Artemidos (after Fairman, H.W and Grdseloff, B., 1947, Texts of Hatshepsut and Sethos I inside Speos Artemidos, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 33, Fig. I)
6.2 Reconstruction of the Amen temple at Karnak during the reign of Hatchepsut
6.3 Plan of Djeser-Djeseru
6.4 Hatchepsut being suckled by the goddess Hathor in the form of a cow (after Davis, T.M., ed., 1906, The Tomb of Hatshopsitu, London, Plate 58)
6.5 Hathor in her anthropoid form (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 101)

CHAPTER 7
7.1 The damaged figure of Senenmut from Tomb 353 (after Dorman, P.F, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plate 81)
7.2 Sketch-portrait of Senenmut from the wall of Tomb 353
7.3 Hatchepsut and Senenmut? Crude graffito from a Deir el-Bahri tomb (after Manniche, L., 1977, Some Aspects of Ancient Egyptian Sexual Life, Acta Orientalia 38, Fig. 4)
7.4 Senenrnut worshipping at Djeser-Djeseru
7.5 Plan and reconstruction of the facade of Tomb 71 (based on Dorman, P.E, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plates 4a and 4c)
7.6 Plan of Tomb 353 (after Dorman, P E, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plate 51c)

CHAPTER 8
8.1 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis III
8.2 Tuthmosis III being suckled by the tree-goddess Isis (after Stevenson Smith, W., revised by W.K. Simpson, 1981, The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Haven and London, Plate 257)
8.3 Tuthmosis III and his mother Isis, boating through the Underworld (after Stevenson Smith, W., revised by W.K. Simpson, 1981, The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Haven and London, Plate 257)
8.4 The High Priestess of Amen-Re, Hatchepsut (after Budge, E.A.W, 1902, Egypt and her Asiatic Empire, London, Fig. 3)

Maps

Chronologies: The Tuthmoside Family Tree; Historical Events

From Our Editors

The forgotten pharaoh -- brilliant, defiant, statesmanlike, and a womanEgypt's Queen -- or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King -- Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 B.C.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the most beautiful structures in the world -- the Deir el-Bahri temple at Luxor. After her death, however, her name and image were viciously attacked, her monuments destroyed or usurped, her place in history systematically obliterated. At last, in this dazzling work of archaeological and historical sleuthing, Joyce Tyldesley rescues this intriguing figure from more than two thousand years of oblivion and finally restores the female pharaoh to her rightful prominence as the first woman in recorded history to rule a nation."An absorbing scholarly biography, based on a meticulous review of the archaeological record, of a remarkable woman". -- Kirkus Reviews