Haunted Inside Passage: Ghosts, Legends, And Mysteries Of Southeast Alaska by Bjorn DihleHaunted Inside Passage: Ghosts, Legends, And Mysteries Of Southeast Alaska by Bjorn Dihle

Haunted Inside Passage: Ghosts, Legends, And Mysteries Of Southeast Alaska

byBjorn Dihle

Paperback | May 2, 2017

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A collection of twenty stories showcasing the supernatural legends and unsolved mysteries of Southeast Alaska, with a focus on the region between Yakutat and Petersburg, where the author has lived his entire life, writing, teaching, guiding, commercial fishing, and investigating ghost stories. Each chapter is rooted in Bjorn's own adventures and will intertwine fascinating history, interviews, and his reflections. Bjorn's writing, sometimes poignant and often wickedly funny, brings to mind Hunter S. Thompson and Patrick McManus.

Chapters touch on legends such as Alexander Baranov, Soapy Smith, James Wickersham, and the Kóoshdaa Káa (Kushtaka) to lesser known but fascinating characters like "Naked" Joe Knowles and purported serial killer Ed Krause. From duplicitous if not downright diabolical humans to demons of the fjords and deep seas and cryptids of the forest, Bjorn presents a lively cross-section of the haunter and the haunted found in Alaska's Inside Passage.

Lifelong Alaskan Bjorn Dihle is a writer who's been published in the magazinesSierra,Alaska,Desert Companion,Coast & Kayak,Adventure Kayak,North of Ordinary,Earth Island Journal,High Country News,Birdwatching,Alaska Sporting Journal,Hunt Alaska,andFish Alaska.He writes a weekly outdoors column for theJuneau Empirenewspaper ("Off the Be...
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Title:Haunted Inside Passage: Ghosts, Legends, And Mysteries Of Southeast AlaskaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:220 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:May 2, 2017Publisher:Graphic Arts BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1943328943

ISBN - 13:9781943328949

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from An okay read This book was a bit disappointing. It started off slow. It got exciting towards the end when she is almost done the trail and then it gets boring again. Not sure why i thought it was boring in those spots, maybe too much detail?
Date published: 2017-10-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Read I loved this book, it was so inspiring.
Date published: 2017-02-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It was okay. Better than wild, which is a very similar concept. But still not the most fascinating book. I think it is harmful because it shows readers that, technically, you can survive a hike like that with very little equipment or preparation. I just hope it didn't inspire anybody to become an unprepared ultra-light hiker, which will risk their lives.
Date published: 2016-12-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Easy read, great book Iam almost done this book. Probably about 150 pages left. I found this book to be an easy read and kept my interest. I think I liked the book so much because I could relate to how she felt about men and unhealthy relationships. Also because I have the same adventure, freespirit in me.
Date published: 2015-12-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Memoir Aspen Matis's newly released memoir, Girl in the Woods, had me captivated from first page to last. From the book's cover: "On my second night of college, I was raped. Shattered and alone, I fled to the Mexican border and headed north through 2,650 miles of desert and mountains to Canada, walking the height of America in search of home. This is the story of how my recklessness became my salvation." More and more, we hear and read stories of walking as a form of therapy and healing. And I agree - walking clears the brain and allows time to think. The physicality of walking such a distance through so many climates is truly overwhelming and simply remarkable. Matis led a sheltered childhood, allowing her mother to make many of her decisions, including dressing her (up until she was sixteen) Yet, on the other hand, she had attempted other solo extended hikes by lying to her parents about where she was. She purposely found a college a great distance from her childhood home to try and find her own footing. But she is unprepared in many ways, both mentally and emotionally for what life away from home will bring. And as the introduction says - the second day there.... I found the first few chapters of Girl in the Woods so compelling and couldn't put the book down. I couldn't wait to see where this walk wold take Aspen - both figuratively and literally. Real life is so unpredictable. Does Matis make choices that everyone would agree with? Absolutely not. Some of those choices put her life in danger - more than once. But, the courage to attempt such a journey has to be applauded. That journey is not just physical - Girl in the Woods is a 'coming of age' story for Matis as she struggles to shed her passivity and find her own footing in the adult world. A large part of that is dealing with the rape and her own sexuality. The descriptions of the trail, the people and the scenery were detailed and vivid and had me imagining what it would be to do such a walk. But this couch potato will continue to live vicariously through others who share their stories. Inevitable comparisons will be made to Cheryl Strayed's Wild. The two women's walks were at different points in their lives and their journeys reflect that. I am fascinated with memoirs - the baring of someone's personal life for public consumption - and criticism. I can't criticize someone's choices and life - I can only say thank you for sharing. Does Matis find her happy ending? Yes - "the trail has shown me how to change" - and no - but that's another story. Isn't that life though? Moving ahead one step at a time, never quite knowing what's around the next bend. Girl in the Woods was a really good read for me.
Date published: 2015-09-25

From the Author

"Compiled and written by Bjorn Dihle, HAUNTED INSIDE PASSAGE: GHOSTS, LEGENDS, AND MYSTERIES OF SOUTHEAST ALASKA is collection of twenty stories showcasing the supernatural legends and unsolved mysteries of Southeast Alaska, with a focus on the region between Yakutat and Petersburg, where the author has lived his entire life, writing, teaching, guiding, commercial fishing, and investigating ghost stories. Each individual chapter is rooted in Bjorn's own adventures and will intertwine fascinating history, interviews, and his reflections. HAUNTED INSIDE PASSAGE ranges from legends such as Alexander Baranov, Soapy Smith, James Wickersham, and the Kóoshdaa Káa (Kushtaka), to lesser known but fascinating characters like "Naked" Joe Knowles and purported serial killer Ed Krause. From duplicitous if not downright diabolical humans to demons of the fjords and deep seas and cryptids of the forest, Bjorn presents a lively cross-section of the haunter and the haunted found in Alaska's Inside Passage. Critique: An absolutely riveting read from beginning to end, HAUNTED INSIDE PASSAGE is a 'must read' for anyone with an interest in the supernatural history of Alaska's Inside Passage. While very highly recommended for both community and academic library collections, it should be noted for personal reading lists that HAUNTED INSIDE PASSAGE is also available in a paperback edition (9781943328949, $16.99)." --Midwest Book Review

Read from the Book

The story begins with founding of Sitka, one of the most beautiful and interesting small cities in North America. Situated at the ramparts of the rugged mountains of Baranof Island and looking out toward the big ocean, it's considered the second capital of Alaska. Kodiak was first. The Shee Atika' Tlingit were the masters of the area, including the sea otter pelt trade, when Alexander Baranov showed up with his fleet of Aleut hunters in 1799 to try to establish the small settlement, "New Archangel," nearby. The Tlingit attacked the fort and massacred its inhabitants in 1802. Two years later, Baranov returned with a flotilla of nearly 1,000 men, mostly Aleut hunters. Before attempting to reestablish New Archangel, Baranov paraded his force through much of Southeast Alaska to strike fear and respect into the different Tlingit clans. In late September of 1804, after a series of failed negotiations and hostilities, the Russian began bombarding the Tlingit fort near Indian River just outside of where downtown Sitka stands today. After several days, and many casualties on both sides, the Tlingit made a long and difficult exodus through the woods and mountains to the other side of the island. There is a cloud of controversy and, at least on my part, almost disbelief surrounding Alexander Baranov. How does a humble Russian merchant who, supposedly largely out of boredom, decided to try his hand in the Siberian fur trade and became bankrupt after an attack by Chukchi Natives, end up, mostly by his own devices, building a Russian Empire in Alaska? He was in his mid-forties when he signed on to the Russian-American Company. He never saw his country or Russian family again. The twenty-eight years he spent securing a foothold for Russia and dominating the fur trade were filled with adventure, violence, and dramatic cultural change. Aleut hunters employed by the company traveled all the way down to California in search of sea otters. Baranov married a Kenai Native and had two children, to whom he was reportedly a good father and for whom he had much affection. Shortly before he was relieved of his post, Baranov sent his son to be educated in Moscow and watched his daughter marry a Russian lieutenant. En route back to Moscow, he died on April 16, 1819, aboard the Kutuzov. He was buried in the blue waters of the Pacific. Baranov Castle was said to have been the Russian administration building for all of Alaska. One of the earliest bits of documentation of a ghost haunting the castle came from writer, adventurer, and first female board member of National Geographic Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore. She wrote in a guidebook to Alaska and the Northwest that, "Two young officers of the U.S.S. Adams and the purser of the Idaho manufactured a ghost story to meet the demands of the first pleasure travelers in 1883, who insisted that the deserted and half-wrecked castle must be haunted. A Lucia di Lammermoor, condemned to marry against her will, killed herself, or was killed by a returned lover, in the drawing-room, the long apartment on the second floor, north side, adjoining the ball-room, where she walks at midnight." The Baranov Castle possessed a lighthouse-the first ever built in Alaska-and its keepers reported it was haunted. One modern-day lighthouse keeper told me virtually every lighthouse is haunted. It's not hard to imagine the ghosts of those lost to sea attracted to a beacon in the darkness, kind of like a moth drawn to a lightbulb. There are a variety of legends circulating around the origin and nature of the ghost. The most popular is that Baranov sent his daughter's lover away to Siberia, told the poor girl the boy had died and forced her to marry someone she despised. On the day of her wedding she killed herself. Another story is that the exiled lover came home, found the princess with another man and murdered her. Since one or the other tragic end, her ghost periodically manifested, filled the castle with the smell of roses and scared the lighthouse keepers. It's a great story, but Baranov was governor until he left Alaska and the only potential Russian princess was his own daughter, Irina, born from his Alaska Native wife. He watched Irina be married, apparently quite happily. The Boston Alaskan, a 1906 publication about the northern territory, relates the romantic, tragic tale of Princess Olga Arbuzoff, which follows in the same vein as the other stories: "The tragic story of Olga Arbuzoff, a niece of Governor Moraveff, still holds its interest, though the incident occurred four-score years ago. The Princess Olga, who was beautiful to look upon, was in love with a midshipman, by name, Demetrius Davidoff. Young, handsome, and accomplished, he was not considered so fitting a match as old Count Vasilieff, whose face was ugly and his morals questionable. The stern uncle diplomatically sent the midshipman on a six months' cruise. In the meantime, preparations were made for the marriage of the princess and the count. On the fifth of March, 1862, the wedding occurred. On the evening of that day young Davidoff returned and made his way at once to the castle. The princess, upon seeing him, screamed, and throwing herself into his arms, snatched his dagger from his side and, plunging it into her heart, fell at his feet dead. In an instant the horror-stricken youth had grasped the dagger and thrusting it deep into his own heart, fell dead by the side of the princess. The next day both lovers were buried in one grave."

Table of Contents

Preface Acknowledgments Map 1. The Mysteries of Yakobi Island 2. The Ghost of Castle Hill 3. A Testament to Ice 4. The Ghosts of Juneau's Past 5. The Terrible Fate of the Clara Nevada 6. The King Con of the Klondike 7. Ghosts of Skagway 8. The Kóoshdaa Káa Chronicles 9. The Legends of Thomas Bay 10. The Sinking of the Islander and the Legend of Its Lost Gold 11. The Ghosts of the House of Wickersham 12. The Curious Case of "the most Diabolical Murderer in Alaska's History" 13. The Tragedy of the Princess Sophia 14. Trouble with Bigfoot 15. The Witches of Southeast Alaska 16. It Came from the Depths: A Brief History of Southeast Alaska's Sea Monsters 17. The Haunting of the Mount Edgecumbe Hospital 18. Ghosts of the Alaskan Hotel 19. Naked Joe: Alaska's Most Famous and Least Known Ghost 20. Juneau's Front Street Ghosts Bibliography

Editorial Reviews

"With glaciers tucked in-between mountains, dark waters cloaking an abundance of marine life, and wild animals lurking just out of sight in copses of hemlock and spruce, many have viewed Southeast Alaska as a mysterious place. Outdoors and humor writer Bjorn Dihle taps into that sense of the Panhandle with his debut book In this unique work, Dihle unites one part nature writing, one part memoir, and one part historical work under the thematic subject of supernatural stories in Southeast. Throughout the book, Dihle's strong voice for nature writing is clear, as well as a healthy dose of levity from his own life to lighten the often somber stories. Each story is not simply anecdotal asides from interviewees, but is set into its historical context, with many interesting facts to learn." --Juneau Empire