Have You Seen Marie?

Paperback | April 8, 2014

bySandra CisnerosIllustratorEster Hernández

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Have You Seen Marie? Showcases the storytelling magic of Sandra Cisneros, beloved author of The House on Mango Street. This lyrically told, richly illustrated fable for adults is the tale of a woman’s search, in the wake of her mother’s death, for a missing cat—and a reminder that love, even when it goes astray, does not stay lost forever.

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Have You Seen Marie? Showcases the storytelling magic of Sandra Cisneros, beloved author of The House on Mango Street. This lyrically told, richly illustrated fable for adults is the tale of a woman’s search, in the wake of her mother’s death, for a missing cat—and a reminder that love, even when it goes astray, does not stay lost fore...

Sandra Cisneros is the author of two highly celebrated novels, The House on Mango Street and Caramelo. Her awards include National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, the Lannan Literary Award, the American Book Award, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Other books include the story collection Woman Hollering Creek; two books of poetry; and t...

other books by Sandra Cisneros

The House on Mango Street
The House on Mango Street

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Woman Hollering Creek: And Other Stories
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see all books by Sandra Cisneros
Format:PaperbackDimensions:112 pages, 6.33 × 5.25 × 0.39 inPublished:April 8, 2014Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307743861

ISBN - 13:9780307743862

Customer Reviews of Have You Seen Marie?

Reviews

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Bookclub Guide

US1. The epigraph is from a poem by Elena Poniatowska: “It’s then I ask you, mama, my mother, my heart, my mother,/my heart, my mother, mama, the sadness I feel. Where do I put it?/Where, mama?” What does this tell us about the story to come?2. “Every day I woke up and felt like a glove left behind at the bus station,” the narrator says at the beginning of the book. What emotion is she expressing? Have you ever felt that way?3. Ester Hernández, the illustrator, lost her own mother just before Cisneros approached her to collaborate on the book. Do you think it helped her in her grieving to create this art?4. How do the illustrations reflect the emotions of the narrator and her friend and show us what they are feeling?5. In addition to the narrator’s loss of her mother and her friend’s loss of Marie, several other characters in the book have experienced loss. Does it help them to know that others have suffered, too?6. On page 42, the women encounter a neighbor who is sitting on her porch, knitting. It reminds the narrator of her mother, who “used to knit ugly scarves no one wanted to wear.” Have you ever had a memory triggered by something like that? Why do you think our memories work that way?7. Throughout the book, people promise to help in some way, but usually forget or become distracted. Why do people make promises they don’t keep? What do you do when someone disappoints you like that?8. The narrator says she feels like an orphan, though normally we think of orphans as children. In what ways is she an orphan? How would you try to help her feel better?9. How does searching for Marie help her cope with her loss?10. Towards the end of the story, the river, the wind, the trees, and the moon all speak to the narrator. How does this help her?11. The Afterword opens: “In Mexico they say that when someone you love dies, a part of you dies with them. But they forget to mention that a part of them is born in you—not immediately, I’ve learned, but eventually, and gradually.” Does this idea help you to feel better in thinking about people you’ve lost?12. Later in the Afterword, Cisneros writes, “I wish somebody had told me that love does not die, that we can continue to receive and give love after death.” Do you agree with her? Who has given you love, and to whom have you given it?13. Cisneros also explains in the Afterword that “There is no getting over death, only learning to travel alongside it.” What does this say about why she wrote this book and how we remember loved ones we have lost?

Editorial Reviews

“A real-life bedtime story for grownups.” —The Seattle Times“Cisneros captures the experience of grief with moving and visceral clarity. . . . Like the best bedtime stories, [Have You Seen Marie?] both honors the darkness around us and keeps the same darkness at bay." —San Francisco Chronicle “[A] magical journey . . . . Cisneros has folded powerful themes into this seemingly simple fable:  onfronting and accepting the loss of a loved one, the importance of community, the presence of spirituality in our lives and the way that imagination and art can illuminate reality . . . . [Characters] come to life not only in Cisneros’ poetic nuggets of prose, but in Ester Hernández’s sweetly realistic color illustrations . . . . The book glows.” —The Miami Herald   “The narrative becomes a springboard for a moving exploration of loss.” —San Antonio Express-News   “Unique and uplifting . . . . Have You Seen Marie? does what every good picture book does by creating meaning through experience while being fun to read aloud . . . . Cisneros and Hernández invite the reader to visually enjoy the story, to listen to the music of the words, and have an experience without getting bogged down in self- help monotony.” —El Paso Times   “[Have You Seen Marie?] is at its heart a parable for adults, whose themes of death, mourning and loss take on new meaning when presented within a simple tale about a cat gone astray . . . . Full of picturesque illustrations of San Antonio and its colorful characters.” —NBC Latino   “A fable for grieving grown- ups, and . . . medicine for hearts broken from loss.” —CNN   “Cisneros’s gift of storytelling and Ester Hernández’s illustrations bring to life the story about death, grief, and the desire to move forward. This book is a wonderful gift to share with someone who is experiencing the pain of losing a loved one.” —Modern Latina