Health and the Rise of Civilization

Paperback | July 24, 1991

byMark Nathan Cohen

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Civilized nations popularly assume that 'primitive' societies are poor, ill, and malnourished and that progress through civilization automatically implies improved health. In this provocative book, Mark Nathan Cohen challenges this belief. Using findings from epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology, Cohen provides fascinating evidence about the actual effects of civilization on health, suggesting that some aspects of 'progress' create as many health problems as they prevent or cure.

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Civilized nations popularly assume that 'primitive' societies are poor, ill, and malnourished and that progress through civilization automatically implies improved health. In this provocative book, Mark Nathan Cohen challenges this belief. Using findings from epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology, Cohen provides fascinating evide...

From the Publisher

Civilized nations popularly assume that 'primitive' societies are poor, ill, and malnourished and that progress through civilization automatically implies improved health. In this provocative book, Mark Nathan Cohen challenges this belief. Using findings from epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology, Cohen provides fascinating evide...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.68 inPublished:July 24, 1991Publisher:Yale University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300050232

ISBN - 13:9780300050233

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From Our Editors

Civilized nations popularly assume that 'primitive' societies are poor, ill, and malnourished and that progress through civilization automatically implies improved health. In this provocative book, Mark Nathan Cohen challenges this belief. Using findings from epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology, Cohen provides fascinating evidence about the actual effects of civilization on health, suggesting that some aspects of 'progress' create as many health problems as they prevent or cure.