Heaven And Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem Of Evil In Classical Chinese Philosophy

Paperback | May 23, 2014

byFranklin Perkins

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That bad things happen to good people was as true in early China as it is today. Franklin Perkins uses this observation as the thread by which to trace the effort by Chinese thinkers of the Warring States Period (c.475-221 BCE), a time of great conflict and division, to seek reconciliation between humankind and the world. Perkins provides rich new readings of classical Chinese texts and reflects on their significance for Western philosophical discourse.

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That bad things happen to good people was as true in early China as it is today. Franklin Perkins uses this observation as the thread by which to trace the effort by Chinese thinkers of the Warring States Period (c.475-221 BCE), a time of great conflict and division, to seek reconciliation between humankind and the world. Perkins provi...

Franklin Perkins is Professor of Philosophy at DePaul University. He is author of Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light and Leibniz: A Guide for the Perplexed.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:May 23, 2014Publisher:Indiana University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0253011728

ISBN - 13:9780253011725

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Note on Abbreviated Citations
Introduction: Philosophy in a Cross-Cultural Context
1. Formations of the Problem of Evil
2. The Efficacy of Human Action and the Mohist Opposition to Fate
3. Efficacy and Following Nature in the Dàodéjng
4. Reproaching Heaven and Serving Heaven in the Mèngz
5. Beyond the Human in the Zhung
6. Xúnz and the Fragility of the Human
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

"It is clear that the discussions in Heaven and Earth will have a major impact on scholarship in the field. While ostensibly about good and evil, its investigations traverse a range of areas including Chinese intellectual history, philosophy, ethics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of action, and political philosophy." -Dao: Journal of Comparative Philosophy