Hemlock: A Forest Giant On The Edge by Anthony D'AmatoHemlock: A Forest Giant On The Edge by Anthony D'Amato

Hemlock: A Forest Giant On The Edge

byAnthony D'Amato, Benjamin BaiserEditorDavid R. Foster

Hardcover | April 29, 2014

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An appreciation of the beautiful, iconic, and endangered Eastern Hemlock and what it means to nature and society

The Eastern Hemlock, massive and majestic, has played a unique role in structuring northeastern forest environments, from Nova Scotia to Wisconsin and through the Appalachian Mountains to North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama. A “foundation species” influencing all the species in the ecosystem surrounding it, this iconic North American tree has long inspired poets and artists as well as naturalists and scientists.

Five thousand years ago, the hemlock collapsed as a result of abrupt global climate change.  Now this iconic tree faces extinction once again because of an invasive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid. Drawing from a century of studies at Harvard University’s Harvard Forest, one of the most well-regarded long-term ecological research programs in North America, the authors explore what hemlock’s modern decline can tell us about the challenges facing nature and society in an era of habitat changes and fragmentation, as well as global change.
David R. Foster, Audrey Barker Plotkin, Anthony D’Amato, Benjamin Baiser, Aaron M. Ellison, David Orwig, Wyatt Oswald, and Jonathan Thompson are scientific collaborators and colleagues at Harvard University’s Harvard Forest.
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Title:Hemlock: A Forest Giant On The EdgeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:336 pages, 10 × 7 × 0.98 inPublished:April 29, 2014Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300179383

ISBN - 13:9780300179385

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Editorial Reviews

“. . . an engrossing read for nonscientists, showing what is special about hemlock woods and why humans have been so attracted to them throughout history.”—Eben Lehman and James G. Lewis, Forest History Today