Here and There: Reading Pennsylvanias Working Landscapes

Paperback | October 28, 2013

byBill Conlogue

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The global economy threatens the uniqueness of places, people, and experiences. In Here and There, Bill Conlogue tests the assumption that literature and local places matter less and less in a world that economists describe as “flat,” politicians believe has “globalized,” and social scientists imagine as a “global village.” Each chapter begins at home, journeys elsewhere, and returns to the author’s native and chosen region, northeastern Pennsylvania. Through the prisms of literature and history, the book explores tensions and conflicts within the region created by national and global demand for its resources: fertile farmland, forest products, anthracite coal, and college-educated young people. Making connections between local and global environmental issues, Here and There uses the Pennsylvania watersheds of urban Lackawanna and rural Lackawaxen to highlight the importance of understanding and protecting the places we call home.

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From the Publisher

The global economy threatens the uniqueness of places, people, and experiences. In Here and There, Bill Conlogue tests the assumption that literature and local places matter less and less in a world that economists describe as “flat,” politicians believe has “globalized,” and social scientists imagine as a “global village.” Each chapte...

Bill Conlogue is Professor of English at Marywood University.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:October 28, 2013Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271060816

ISBN - 13:9780271060811

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Contents

List of Figures and Maps

Preface: Homework

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Orientation

1 Working Watersheds

2 Merwin and Mining

3 Fixing Fence

4 Barn Razing

5 Other Places

6 Rendering the Mounds of Home

Coda: Watersheds in Play

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

“One can only wish that everyone loved the homes they were born into as much as Conlogue loves his; he renders Scranton and rural Wayne County with such enthusiasm and undying interest as to make the anthracite region appear rich with meaning and beauty.”

—Michael Buozis, Philadelphia Review of Books