Here in Harlem: Poems in Many Voices by Walter Dean MyersHere in Harlem: Poems in Many Voices by Walter Dean Myers

Here in Harlem: Poems in Many Voices

byWalter Dean Myers

Paperback | December 5, 2008

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Acclaimed writer Walter Dean Myers celebrates the people of Harlem with these powerful and soulful first-person poems in the voices of the residents who make up the legendary neighborhood: basketball players, teachers, mail carriers, jazz artists, maids, veterans, nannies, students, and more. Exhilarating and electric, these poems capture the energy and resilience of a neighborhood and a people.
Walter Dean Myers (1937 - 2014) was born in Martinsburg, West Virginia. He was one of the premier authors of books for children, and received numerous awards including the Michael L. Printz award and the Coretta Scott King Award.
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Title:Here in Harlem: Poems in Many VoicesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9.2 × 5.5 × 0.3 inPublished:December 5, 2008Publisher:Holiday HouseLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0823422127

ISBN - 13:9780823422128

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Starred Review. Grade 6 Up-Myers's skill with characterization and voice are apparent as he models Edgar Lee Masters's Spoon River Anthology (Sagebrush, 1962) to bring Harlem to life for readers. A complexity of experiences comes through vividly in the varying poetic styles, from the Deacon Macon R. Allen: "Don't give me no whispering church/Don't be mumbling nothing to my Lord/You came in crying and you going out crying/So don't be holding back the word" to 14-year-old Didi Taylor: "I'd love to live on Sugar Hill/Be as rich as I could be/Then all the folks from down the way/Would have to envy me/I'd stick my hincty pinky out/Put my hincty nose in the air/Get a hincty chauffeur to drive my car/And a white girl to do my hair." Selected black-and-white photos from different time periods accompany some of the poems, but the connection to the subjects is often slight. While there are occasional references to historical events or people, this collection can be enjoyed without knowing them. The rich and exciting text will give readers a flavor of the multiplicity of times and peoples of Harlem, and the more than 50 voices will stay with them, resurfacing as their understanding of the context develops. Use this title to supplement classroom presentations, for individual or choral recitation, or simply suggest that teens find a good chair, get comfortable, and listen to what the people have to tell them.-Nina Lindsay, Oakland Public Library, CA