Hermione by Hilda DoolittleHermione by Hilda Doolittle

Hermione

byHilda Doolittle

Paperback | January 1, 1981

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This autobiographical novel, an interior self-portrait of the poet H.D. (1886-1961) is what can best be described as a 'find', a posthumous treasure. In writing this book, H.D. returned to a year in her life that was 'peculiarly blighted.' She was in her early twenties--'a disappointment to her father, an odd duckling to her mother, an importunate, overgrown, unincarnated entity that had no place... Waves to fight against, to fight against alone... 'I am Hermione Gart, a failure'--she cried in her dementia, 'I am Her, Her, Her.' She had failed at Bryn Mawr, she felt hemmed in by her family, she did not yet know what she was going to do with her life.
Born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, Hilda Doolittle was educated at Bryn Mawr College. In 1911, after a visit abroad, she helped to organize the imagists with Ezra Pound. She married Richard Aldington, the English poet and novelist, whom she later divorced. Written in poetic prose, her poignant and subtle Tribute to Freud: With Unpublishe...
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Title:HermioneFormat:PaperbackDimensions:1 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.67 inPublished:January 1, 1981

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0811208176

ISBN - 13:9780811208178

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from "...the pleasures of slaves" The langors of hell, and uniqueness saturate this autobiography. The awkwardness of genius, of youth of heroism, tremble one's reserve here, charge with sapphire tongues over one's skin- more naked in the folds of this book-and drown one in it's first debilitating kiss. The only justification for writing of oneself is the relentless use of hieroglyphics:only a language exclusive to oneself can convey oneself.
Date published: 2000-05-26

From Our Editors

This autobiographical novel, an interior self-portrait of the poet H.D. (1886-1961) is what can best be described as a 'find', a posthumous treasure. In writing this book, H.D. returned to a year in her life that was 'peculiarly blighted.' She was in her early twenties--'a disappointment to her father, an odd duckling to her mother, an importunate, overgrown, unincarnated entity that had no place... Waves to fight against, to fight against alone... 'I am Hermione Gart, a failure'--she cried in her dementia, 'I am Her, Her, Her.' She had failed at Bryn Mawr, she felt hemmed in by her family, she did not yet know what she was going to do with her life.