High Speed Digital Design: A Handbook Of Black Magic by Howard JohnsonHigh Speed Digital Design: A Handbook Of Black Magic by Howard Johnson

High Speed Digital Design: A Handbook Of Black Magic

byHoward Johnson, Martin Graham

Hardcover | April 8, 1993

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Focused on the field of knowledge lying between digital and analog circuit theory, this new text will help engineers working with digital systems shorten their product development cycles and help fix their latest design problems. The scope of the material covered includes signal reflection, crosstalk, and noise problems which occur in high speed digital machines (above 10 megahertz). This volume will be of practical use to digital logic designers, staff and senior communications scientists, and all those interested in digital design.

Howard W. Johnson is president of Olympic Technology Group, Inc., of Redmond, Washington, a digital electronic design and consulting organization. Before founding the firm, he was Manager of Technology and Advanced Development at Ultra Network Technologies, a manufacturer of gigabit-per-second local area networks for superc...
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Title:High Speed Digital Design: A Handbook Of Black MagicFormat:HardcoverDimensions:384 pages, 9.3 × 7.3 × 1.1 inPublished:April 8, 1993Publisher:Pearson Education

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0133957241

ISBN - 13:9780133957242

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from The best for designers The best book on hardware design that I have seen. Very good tips and usefull formulas. I recomend it to any one, many problems will make sense after reading this book. Fausto
Date published: 2001-05-29

From the Author

PrefaceThis is a book for digital designers. It highlights and explains analog circuit principles relevant to highspeed digital design. Teaching by example, the authors cover ringing, crosstalk, and radiated noise problems which commonly beset highspeed digital machines.None of this material is new. On the contrary, it has been handed down by word of mouth and passed along through application notes for many years. This book simply collects together that wisdom. Because much of this material is not covered in standard college curricula, many practicing engineers view highspeed effects as somewhat mysterious, ominous, or daunting. For them, this subject matter has earned the name "black magic." The authors would like to dispel the popular myth that anything unusual or unexplained happens at high speeds. It’s simply a matter of knowing which principles apply, and how.Digital designers working at low speeds do not need this material. In lowspeed designs, signals remain clean and well behaved, conforming nicely to the binary model.At high speeds, where fast signal rise times exaggerate the influence of analog effects, engineers experience a completely different view of logic signals. To them, logic signals often appear hairy, jagged, and distorted. For their products to function, highspeed designers must know and use analog principles. This book explains what those principles are and how to apply them.Readers without the benefit of formal training in analog circuit theory can use and apply the formulas and examples in this book. Readers who have completed a first year class in introductory linear circuit theory may comprehend this material at a deeper level.Chapters 13 introduce analog circuit terminology, the highspeed properties of logic gates, and standard highspeed measurement techniques, respectively. These three chapters form the core of the book and should be included in any serious study of highspeed logic design.The remaining chapters, 412, each treat specialized topics in highspeed logic design and may be studied in any order.Appendix A collects highlights from each section, listing the most important ideas and concepts presented. It can be used as a checklist for system design or as an index to the text when facing a difficult problem.Appendix B details the mathematical assumptions behind various forms of rise time measurement. This section helps relate results given in this book to other sources and standards of nomenclature.Appendix C lists standard formulas for computing the resistance, capacitance, and inductance of physical structures. These formulas have been implemented in MathCad and are available from the authors in magnetic form.

Read from the Book

Preface This is a book for digital designers. It highlights and explains analog circuit principles relevant to high-speed digital design. Teaching by example, the authors cover ringing, crosstalk, and radiated noise problems which commonly beset high-speed digital machines. None of this material is new. On the contrary, it has been handed down by word of mouth and passed along through application notes for many years. This book simply collects together that wisdom. Because much of this material is not covered in standard college curricula, many practicing engineers view high-speed effects as somewhat mysterious, ominous, or daunting. For them, this subject matter has earned the name "black magic." The authors would like to dispel the popular myth that anything unusual or unexplained happens at high speeds. It's simply a matter of knowing which principles apply, and how. Digital designers working at low speeds do not need this material. In low-speed designs, signals remain clean and well behaved, conforming nicely to the binary model. At high speeds, where fast signal rise times exaggerate the influence of analog effects, engineers experience a completely different view of logic signals. To them, logic signals often appear hairy, jagged, and distorted. For their products to function, high-speed designers must know and use analog principles. This book explains what those principles are and how to apply them. Readers without the benefit of formal training in analog circuit theory can use and apply the formulas and examples in this book. Readers who have completed a first year class in introductory linear circuit theory may comprehend this material at a deeper level. Chapters 1-3 introduce analog circuit terminology, the high-speed properties of logic gates, and standard high-speed measurement techniques, respectively. These three chapters form the core of the book and should be included in any serious study of high-speed logic design. The remaining chapters, 4-12, each treat specialized topics in high-speed logic design and may be studied in any order. Appendix A collects highlights from each section, listing the most important ideas and concepts presented. It can be used as a checklist for system design or as an index to the text when facing a difficult problem. Appendix B details the mathematical assumptions behind various forms of rise time measurement. This section helps relate results given in this book to other sources and standards of nomenclature. Appendix C lists standard formulas for computing the resistance, capacitance, and inductance of physical structures. These formulas have been implemented in MathCad and are available from the authors in magnetic form.

Table of Contents



 1. Inner Eurasia before the Slavic Era, Pre-history-500.


 2. Origins of an East Slavic Civilization, 500-1000.


 3. Kiev Rus, 1000-1237.


 4. The Eastern Slavs in the Mongol Empire, 1237-1360.


 5. The Rise of Moscow, 1350s-1460s.


 6. The Making of the Muscovite State: 1460s-1560s.


 7. The Collapse and Recovery of Muscovy, 1560-1620.


 8. Muscovite Imperial Expansion, 1620-1700.


 9. Russia Becomes a European “Great Power,” 1700-1750.


10. Russia in the Age of Enlightenment, 1750-1815.


11. Russia in the Age of Conservatism, 1815-1856.

From Our Editors

Focusing on a combination of digital and analog design techniques, this comprehensive volume will help digital engineers hone their design skills, shorten their product development cycles and master the field of signal integrity.