Historical Dictionary Of The 1920s: From World War I To The New Deal, 1919-1933

Hardcover | June 1, 1988

byJames Stuart Olson

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The Dictionary presents more than 700 short essays on people--George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Warren Gamaliel Harding, and Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle; legislation--Agricultural Marketing Act of 1929, the Revenue Acts of 1921, 1924, and 1926, and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation Act of 1932; popular culture--baseball, motion pictures, radio, jazz; foreign policy--the Washington Naval Conference of 1921-1922, the Nine Power Treaty, the League of Nations; politics; social history--women's rights, the Harlem Renaissance, immigration; and culture--the Lost Generation, expatriatism. A detailed chronology and selected bibliography with twenty-three subcategores complete this history of the 1920s.

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The Dictionary presents more than 700 short essays on people--George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Warren Gamaliel Harding, and Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle; legislation--Agricultural Marketing Act of 1929, the Revenue Acts of 1921, 1924, and 1926, and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation Act of 1932; popular culture--baseball, motion pictures, rad...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:420 pages, 5.98 × 9.01 × 1.12 inPublished:June 1, 1988Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313256837

ISBN - 13:9780313256837

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?This is yet another fine historical dictionary from Greenwood. . . . The present volume focuses on prominent politicians, important sports figures, labor leaders, radicals, artists, playwrights, novelists, composers, filmmakers, etc. There are entries for important legal cases such as Loeb-Leopold and Sacco and Vanzetti, discussions of important legislation, comments on social issues such as prohibition, discussion of fads such as flagpole sitting and marathon dancing, entries for radio shows like "Amos and Andy" and "Death Valley Days," and even discussion of popular board games like mah jong. . . . This carefully edited work should prove an asset for all reference collections and as a useful handbook for students of twentieth-century American history.?-Reference Books Bulletin