Historical, Theoretical, and Sociological Foundations of Reading in the United States by Jeanne Cobb

Historical, Theoretical, and Sociological Foundations of Reading in the United States

byJeanne Cobb, Mary Katherine Kallus

Paperback | June 25, 2010

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A select sampling of the perspectives of leading reading researchers, combined with those of practitioners from various fields of study–educational psychology, special education, sociology, bilingual education, linguistics–to present a comprehensive look at the current state of reading instruction.

 

Theoretical, Historical, and Sociological Foundations of Reading in the United States combines a variety of thoughts about the processes and foundations of reading to provide a firm understanding of reading instruction: how it has been taught in the past, the disciplines that have contributed to the study of reading along the way and the new frontiers into which the field is migrating.

About The Author

Dr. Jeanne Cobb is Professor of Literacy Education at Coastal Carolina University and has over 26 years of experience in education as an elementary school teacher, reading specialist, Title I teacher, university professor, and reading clinic director. Dr. Cobb’s primary research interests are in the field of emergent literacy and inte...

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Title:Historical, Theoretical, and Sociological Foundations of Reading in the United StatesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 9 × 7.3 × 1.1 inPublished:June 25, 2010Publisher:Pearson EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0137020392

ISBN - 13:9780137020393

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Section I: Historical Foundations of Reading

Introduction........................................................................................................................... 1

            Timeline................................................................................................................................. 4

Chapter 1: Reading: A Brief History to 1899.......................................................................... 7

Mary Katherine Kallus and Phillip Ratliff

Chapter 2: Reading in the 20th Century................................................................................. 20

P. David Pearson

            Summary of Early Reading Recommendations in National Research Syntheses...................... 79

P. David Pearson

Helpful Websites Section I................................................................................................... 81

Section II: Theoretical Perspectives: Intersections of Text and Reader

Introduction......................................................................................................................... 83

Timeline............................................................................................................................... 86

Chapter 3: What is Text? A 21st Century Definition.............................................................. 88

Mary Katherine Kallus

Chapter 4: Who is the Reader Cognitive, Linguistic, and Affective Factors                      Impacting Readers       103

Jeanne B. Cobb and Patricia Whitney

Chapter 5: Role of the Reader’s Schema in Comprehension, Learning and Memory............ 140

Richard C. Anderson

Chapter 6: Schema Activation and Schema Acquisition: Comments on

Richard C. Anderson’s Remarks........................................................................................ 155

John Bransford

Chapter 7: The Transactional Theory of Reading and Writing.............................................. 170

Louise Rosenblatt

Helpful Websites Section II................................................................................................ 208

Section III: Theoretical Perspectives: Intersections of Psychology, Cognitive Theory, Reading , and the Reader

Introduction....................................................................................................................... 210

Timeline............................................................................................................................. 213

Chapter 8: Intersections of Educational Psychology and the Teaching of Reading:  Connections to the Classroom           215

Kathie Good

Chapter 9: The Brain and Reading ..................................................................................... 234

Russell Vaden

Chapter 10: Inquiry and Literacy: An Unquestionable Connection....................................... 262

Nancy Gallenstein

Chapter 11: Some ‘Wonderings’ About Literacy Teacher Education................................... 285

Donna Alvermann

Constructivism/Constructionism Matrix............................................................................... 292

Additional Suggested Readings Reference List.................................................................... 293

Helpful Websites Section III.............................................................................................. 295

Section IV: Theoretical Perspectives: Intersection of Language, Society, Culture, and the Reader

 

Introduction....................................................................................................................... 304

Timeline............................................................................................................................. 307

Chapter 12: Language and Culture in a Diverse World........................................................ 309

Romelia Hurtado de Vivas

Chapter 13: Literacy in the First and Second (Subsequent) Languages: Ways into Spoken, Reading, and Writing Competence...................................................................................................................... 331

Elizabeth A. Galligan

Chapter 14: Developing Literacy in English Learners: Practical “Nuts and Bolts”................. 351

Geni Flores

Chapter 15: Sociolinguistics............................................................................................... 363

Roger Shuy

Chapter 16: On the Psycholinguistic Method of Teaching Reading....................................... 380

Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman

Chapter 17: Funds of Knowledge for Teaching: Using a Qualitative Approach ................... 386

Luis C. Moll, Cathy Amanti, Deborah Neff, and Norma Gonzalez

Chapter 18: Critical Literacy: Crises and Choices in the Current Arrangement .................... 398

Scott Morris

Helpful Websites Section IV.............................................................................................. 453

 

Section V : New Frontiers: Intersections of the Past, Present, and Future in Reading Instruction and Research

 

Introduction....................................................................................................................... 459

Chapter 19: Toward a Theory of New Literacies Emerging from the Internet and Other Information and Communication Technologies..................................................................................................................... 462

Donald J. Leu, Jr., Charles K. Kinzer, Julie L. Coiro, and Dana W. Cammack

Chapter 20: The College Classroom as Pensieve—Putting Language, Power, and Authority to Productive Use   508

Walter Jacobs

Chapter 21: Literacy Instruction on Multimodal Texts: Past, Present, and Future................. 536

Amy Wilson

Chapter 22: Reading Assessment: Looking Backward, Living in the Present Climate of Accountability, Crafting a Vision for the Future.......................................................................................................................... 552

Jeanne B. Cobb

Chapter 23: Living a Literate Life in the “Third Bubble”: A Case Study of a High School Dropout in Solitary Confinement in a Maximum Security Prison................................................................................................ 580

Jeanne B. Cobb

Helpful Websites Section V............................................................................................... 610

Index................................................................................................................................. 614