Historiography at the End of the Republic: Provincial Perspectives on Roman Rule by Liv Mariah Yarrow

Historiography at the End of the Republic: Provincial Perspectives on Roman Rule

byLiv Mariah Yarrow

Hardcover | April 21, 2006

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This study of six historians from the edges of the Roman world at the end of the Republic - the author of I Maccabees, Posidonius, Diodorus Siculus, Pompeius Trogus, Nicolaus of Damascus, and Memnon of Heraclea - combines discussion of their biographical details, the intellectual and eliteculture in which they composed, and the methodological difficulties of interpreting fragmentary texts, with textual analysis of their representations of Rome. These authors show remarkable unity in their acceptance of Roman hegemony. Nevertheless, their interpretations of Roman rule assume politicalsignificance in the light of their intentions in writing and the audiences whom they addressed. They therefore provide a unique insight into the minds of the conquered peoples and the intellectual culture which allowed them to influence their conquerors.

About The Author

Liv Mariah Yarrow is Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Brooklyn College, CUNY.

Details & Specs

Title:Historiography at the End of the Republic: Provincial Perspectives on Roman RuleFormat:HardcoverDimensions:416 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.11 inPublished:April 21, 2006Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199277540

ISBN - 13:9780199277544

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Table of Contents

Setting the Scene1. The Power of the Intellectual: Leading Thinkers, Thinking Leaders2. Theory and Method3. Constructing the Narrative: Authorial Objectives and the Use of Rome4. From the Outside Looking in: Roman Culture and Domestic Politics5. The Romans Abroad: Force, Diplomacy, and the Management of Empire6. Enemies of Rome? The Symbolic AlternativesConclusion