Holocene Extinctions

Hardcover | June 28, 2009

EditorSamuel T. Turvey

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The extent to which human activity has influenced species extinctions during the recent prehistoric past remains controversial due to other factors such as climatic fluctuations and a general lack of data. However, the Holocene (the geological interval spanning the last 11,500 years from theend of the last glaciation) has witnessed massive levels of extinctions that have continued into the modern historical era, but in a context of only relatively minor climatic fluctuations. This makes a detailed consideration of these extinctions a useful system for investigating the impacts of humanactivity over time.Holocene Extinctions describes and analyses the range of global extinction events which have occurred during this key time period, as well as their relationship to both earlier and ongoing species losses. By integrating information from fields as diverse as zoology, ecology, palaeontology,archaeology and geography, and by incorporating data from a broad range of taxonomic groups and ecosystems, this novel text provides a fascinating insight into human impacts on global extinction rates, both past and present.This truly interdisciplinary book is suitable for both graduate students and researchers in these varied fields. It will also be of value and use to policy-makers and conservation professionals since it provides valuable guidance on how to apply lessons from the past to prevent future biodiversityloss and inform modern conservation planning.

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The extent to which human activity has influenced species extinctions during the recent prehistoric past remains controversial due to other factors such as climatic fluctuations and a general lack of data. However, the Holocene (the geological interval spanning the last 11,500 years from theend of the last glaciation) has witnessed mas...

Samuel Turvey is Research Fellow at the Institute of Zoology, a department of the Zoological Society of London. He is a conservation biologist with a principal interest in the history and prehistory of human-caused extinctions and in developing conservation strategies for today's threatened species. He was deeply involved with the con...

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Holocene Extinctions
Holocene Extinctions

Kobo ebook|May 28 2009

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.98 inPublished:June 28, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199535094

ISBN - 13:9780199535095

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Anson W. Mackay: An Introduction to Late Glacial - Holocene Environments2. Samuel T. Turvey: In the Shadow of the Megafauna: Prehistoric Mammal and Bird Extinctions across the Holocene3. Samuel T. Turvey: Holocene Mammal Extinctions4. Tommy Tyrberg: Holocene Avian Extinctions5. Wendell R. Haag: Past and Future Patterns of Freshwater Mussel Extinctions in North America during the Holocene6. Nicholas K. Dulvy, John K. Pinnegar and John D. Reynolds: Holocene Extinctions in the Sea7. R. Paul Scofield: Procellariform Extinctions in the Holocene: Threat Processes and Wider Ecosystem-Scale Implications8. Robert R. Dunn: Coextinction: Anecdotes, Models and Speculation9. Ben Collen and Samuel T. Turvey: Probabilistic Methods for Determining Extinction Chronologies10. Samuel T. Turvey and Joanne H. Cooper: The Past is Another Country: Is Evidence for Prehistoric, Historical and Present-Day Extinction Really Comparable?11. Rob Marchant, Simon Brewer, Thompson Webb III and Samuel T. Turvey: Holocene Deforestation: A History of Human-Environmental Interactions, Climate Change and Extinction12. Julie L. Lockwood, Tim M. Blackburn, Phillip Cassey and Julian D. Olden: The Shape of Things to Come: Non-Native Mammalian Predators and the Fate of Island Bird Diversity13. J. R. Stewart: The Quaternary Fossil Record as a Source of Data for Evidence-Based Conservation: Is the Past the Key to the Future?14. Arne O. Mooers, Simon J. Goring, Samuel T. Turvey and Tyler S. Kuhn: Holocene Extinctions and the Loss of Feature DiversityReferences