Homer And The Origin Of The Greek Alphabet by Barry B. PowellHomer And The Origin Of The Greek Alphabet by Barry B. Powell

Homer And The Origin Of The Greek Alphabet

byBarry B. Powell

Paperback | October 28, 1996

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What caused the invention of the Greek alphabet? Who did it, and why? The purpose of this challenging book is to inquire systematically into the historical causes that underlay the radical shift from earlier and less efficient writing systems to the use of alphabetic writing. The author declares his conclusion to be a possibly surprising one--that a single man, perhaps from the island of Euboea, invented the Greek alphabet specifically in order to record the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer.
Title:Homer And The Origin Of The Greek AlphabetFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:308 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inShipping dimensions:8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:October 28, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052158907X

ISBN - 13:9780521589079

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Table of Contents

Foreword: why was the Greek alphabet invented? 1. Review of criticism: what we know about the origin of the Greek alphabet; 2. Argument from the history of writing: how writing worked before the Greek alphabet; 3. Argument from the material remains: Greek inscriptions from the beginning to c. 650 BC; 4. Argument from coincidence: dating Greece's earliest poet; 5. Conclusions from probability: how the Iliad and the Odyssey were written down; Appendix I: Gelb's theory of the syllabic nature of West Semitic writing; Appendix II: Homeric references in poets of the seventh century.

From Our Editors

The purpose of this challenging book is to inquire systematically into the historical causes that underlay the radical shift from earlier and less efficient writing-systems to the use of alphabetic writing. The author declares his conclusion to be a possibly surprising one - that a single man, perhaps from the island of Euboea, invented the Greek alphabet specifically in order to record the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer.

Editorial Reviews

'[This] is an important book, and will be widely read by students of writing in other cultures as well as by Homerists, linguists, historians and archaeologists of early Greece.' Classical Philology