Hooligans In Khrushchev's Russia: Defining, Policing, and Producing Deviance during the Thaw by Brian Lapierre

Hooligans In Khrushchev's Russia: Defining, Policing, and Producing Deviance during the Thaw

byBrian Lapierre

Paperback | December 10, 2012

not yet rated|write a review

Pricing and Purchase Info

$38.95

Earn 195 plum® points

Ships within 3-5 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Swearing, drunkenness, promiscuity, playing loud music, brawling—in the Soviet Union these were not merely bad behavior, they were all forms of the crime of “hooliganism.” Defined as “rudely violating public order and expressing clear disrespect for society,” hooliganism was one of the most common and confusing crimes in the world’s first socialist state. Under its shifting, ambiguous, and elastic terms, millions of Soviet citizens were arrested and incarcerated for periods ranging from three days to five years and for everything from swearing at a wife to stabbing a complete stranger.
    Hooligans in Khrushchev's Russia offers the first comprehensive study of how Soviet police, prosecutors, judges, and ordinary citizens during the Khrushchev era (1953–64) understood, fought against, or embraced this catch-all category of criminality. Using a wide range of newly opened archival sources, it portrays the Khrushchev period—usually considered as a time of liberalizing reform and reduced repression—as an era of renewed harassment against a wide range of state-defined undesirables and as a time when policing and persecution were expanded to encompass the mundane aspects of everyday life. In an atmosphere of Cold War competition, foreign cultural penetration, and transatlantic anxiety over “rebels without a cause,” hooliganism emerged as a vital tool that post-Stalinist elites used to civilize their uncultured working class, confirm their embattled cultural ideals, and create the right-thinking and right-acting socialist society of their dreams.

About The Author

Brian LaPierre is assistant professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Details & Specs

Title:Hooligans In Khrushchev's Russia: Defining, Policing, and Producing Deviance during the ThawFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.9 inPublished:December 10, 2012Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299287440

ISBN - 13:9780299287443

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Hooligans In Khrushchev's Russia: Defining, Policing, and Producing Deviance during the Thaw

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Tables

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1 A Portrait of Hooliganism and the Hooligan during the Khrushchev Period

2 Private Matters or Public Crimes? The Emergence of Domestic Hooliganism in Soviet Russia

3 Making Hooliganism on a Mass Scale: The Campaign Against Petty Hooliganism

4 Empowering Public Activism: The Khrushchev-Era Campaign to Mobilize Obshchestvennost' in the Fight Against Hooliganism

5 The Rise and Fall of the Soft Line on Petty Crime

Conclusion: Plus ça change, plus c'est la meme chose: Hooliganism After Khrushchev

Notes

Bibliography

Index
 

Editorial Reviews

“Adds significantly to our understanding of crime and justice under Khrushchev. It also provides rich food for thought as scholars take on the challenge of fully understanding what living in the workers’ state actually meant for members of the urban proletariat some forty years into the experiment and in the wake of a devastating war.”—Journal of Modern History