Hot Popsicles by Charles Harper Webb

Hot Popsicles

byCharles Harper Webb

Paperback | February 16, 2005

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A woman falls in love—literally—with a house; Werner Heisenberg confronts his own uncertainty; a rat (the rodent kind) runs for president; Hamlet has trouble with his prostate; Superman battles senility and more in this new poetry collection from the winner of the 1999 Felix Pollak Prize for poetry.

About The Author

Charles Harper Webb is professor of English at California State University, Long Beach, as well as a psychotherapist in private practice. He has published a novel, The Wilderness Effect, and six collections of poems, including Liver, winner of the Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry.
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Details & Specs

Title:Hot PopsiclesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:80 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.3 inPublished:February 16, 2005Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299209946

ISBN - 13:9780299209940

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"Ah, yes-in one of these new prose poems, a mere 10,000 people turn out for a poetry reading because there was no publicity and it's also the night that Elvis returns from the grave. Isn't it always that way? Charles Harper Webb's work continues to dazzle, and this time the fire that startles and delights us is generated by the friction between the way the world is and the way people want it to be. A whiny roast beef complains, 'You treat me like a piece of meat,' and a rat can't get elected to office because people say 'don't trust that rat' and 'what a rat.' But Webb is more powerful than Elvis dead or alive, and he fights this literalness with powerful alchemy-what are the philosopher's stone and the universal solvent, compared to hot popsicles?"—David Kirby, poet, writer for the New York Times, and W. Guy McKenzie professor of English at Florida State University