House of Lords Reform Since 1911: Must the Lords Go? by P. Dorey

House of Lords Reform Since 1911: Must the Lords Go?

byP. Dorey, A. Kelso

Hardcover | April 5, 2011

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This text examines the debates and developments about House of Lords reform since 1911, and notes that disagreements have occurred within, as well as between, the main political parties and governments throughout this time. It draws attention to how various proposals for reform have raised a wider range of constitutional and political problems.

About The Author

PETER DOREY is Reader in British Politics at Cardiff University, UK. He has published widely on various aspects of post-1945 British politics and public policy. His previous books include The Labour Party and Constitutional Reform (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), The Conservative Party and the Trade Unions, Policy Making in Britain: An Int...
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House of Lords Reform Since 1911: Must the Lords Go?
House of Lords Reform Since 1911: Must the Lords Go?

by P. Dorey

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Details & Specs

Title:House of Lords Reform Since 1911: Must the Lords Go?Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.04 inPublished:April 5, 2011Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230271669

ISBN - 13:9780230271661

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Firing the First Shots: The 1911 Parliament Act and Inter-War Initiatives
Labour Learns the Complexities of Lords Reform: The 1949 Parliament Act
Pouring New Wine into the Old Bottle: The 1958 Life Peerages Act
A Right of Renunciation: The 1963 Peerage Act
Crossman Can’t Convince his Colleagues: The 1969 Parliament (No.2) Bill 202
Out With the Hereditary Peers – or most of them: The 1999 House of Lords Act and Beyond
Conclusion: A Constant Constitutional Conundrum