How it Feels to be Free: Black Women Entertainers and Civil Rights Activism in the 1960s

Hardcover | December 11, 2013

byRuth Feldstein

not yet rated|write a review
The Civil Rights movement and popular culture are so closely intertwined in American memory that, even today, the soundtrack of counter-cultural opposition is what many still associate with the 1960s mainstream. What is less remembered today is how risky political activism was, on andoff-stage, for black female entertainers who were simultaneously trying to gain mass popularity. Rather than looking at the women of the sit-ins and popular protests, Ruth Feldstein in this project considers the public careers and activism of popular entertainers-actress Lena Horne, vocalist NinaSimone, model-turned-singer Abbey Lincoln, folk singer Miriam Makeba, actress Diahann Carroll, and actress Cicely Tyson. She examines each woman's personal political commitments and connections, and the ways that they were used nationally and internationally as symbols of the African American and women's rights struggles, in order to highlight particular moments of change in politics, the entertainment industry, andnotions of celebrity. Their cultural work, she argues, helped to constitute the climate in which dramatic political events and changes occurred, as well as how they and their work have been and remembered by the public.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$29.95

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

The Civil Rights movement and popular culture are so closely intertwined in American memory that, even today, the soundtrack of counter-cultural opposition is what many still associate with the 1960s mainstream. What is less remembered today is how risky political activism was, on andoff-stage, for black female entertainers who were ...

Ruth Feldstein is Associate Professor of History, Harvard University. She is the author of Motherhood in Black and White: Race and Sex in American Liberalism, 1930-1965.

other books by Ruth Feldstein

Format:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.98 inPublished:December 11, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195314034

ISBN - 13:9780195314038

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of How it Feels to be Free: Black Women Entertainers and Civil Rights Activism in the 1960s

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction1. "The World Was On Fire": Making New York City Subcultures2. "Africa's Musical Ambassador": Miriam Makeba and the "Voice of Africa" in the United States3. "I Don't Trust You Anymore": Nina Simone and Black Cultural Nationalism4. Hollywood Time: Black Women and Integration Narratives in the Late 1960s5. Cicely Tyson and African American History: Popular Culture and "Post"-Civil Rights in the 1970sEpilogueNotesBibliographyIndex