How not to be a Hypocrite: School Choice for the Morally Perplexed Parent by Adam SwiftHow not to be a Hypocrite: School Choice for the Morally Perplexed Parent by Adam Swift

How not to be a Hypocrite: School Choice for the Morally Perplexed Parent

byAdam SwiftEditorAdam Swift

Paperback | May 9, 2003

Pricing and Purchase Info

$64.61 online 
$68.50 list price save 5%
Earn 323 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

How not to be a hypocrite:the indispensable guide to school choice that morally perplexed parents have been waiting for.
Many of us believe in social justice and equality of opportunity - but we also want the best for our kids. How can we square our political principles with our special concern for our own children? This marvellous book takes us through the moral minefield that is school choice today.
Does a commitment to social justice mean you have to send your children to the local comprehensive - regardless of its academic results? Is it hypocritical to disapprove of private schools and yet send your child to one? Some parents feel guilty but shouldn't. Others should feel guilty but don't. ReadHow Not to be a Hypocrite, then answer the questionnaire, and work out where you stand on this crucial issue.
Adam Swift is Fellow and Tutor in Politics and Sociology at the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford.
Loading
Title:How not to be a Hypocrite: School Choice for the Morally Perplexed ParentFormat:PaperbackPublished:May 9, 2003Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415311179

ISBN - 13:9780415311175

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

IntroductionPart I - Choosing the School Rules1. What can I do for my children? 2. What am I buying? 3. What's wrong with selection? 4. The real world 5. Respecting parents' rightsPart II - Choosing Schools Given the Rules6. Why hypocrisy is a red herring 7.Legitimate partiality and individual choice 8. How good is good enough? 9. The futility of individual choice? 10. It is not my decision 11. Moving House Conclusion