How People Change: Relationships And Neuroplasticity In Psychotherapy by Marion SolomonHow People Change: Relationships And Neuroplasticity In Psychotherapy by Marion Solomon

How People Change: Relationships And Neuroplasticity In Psychotherapy

byMarion Solomon, Daniel J. Siegel

Hardcover | May 9, 2017

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Growth and change are at the heart of all successful psychotherapy. Regardless of one's clinical orientation or style, psychotherapy is an emerging process that s created moment by moment, between client and therapist.

  How People Change explores the complexities of attachment, the brain, mind, and body as they aid change during psychotherapy. Research is presented about the properties of healing relationships and communication strategies that facilitate change in the social brain. Contributions by Philip M. Bromberg, Louis Cozolino and Vanessa Davis, Margaret Wilkinson, Pat Ogden, Peter A. Levine, Russell Meares, Dan Hughes, Martha Stark, Stan Tatkin, Marion Solomon, and Daniel J. Siegel and Bonnie Goldstein.

Marion Solomon, Ph.D., is a lecturer at the David Geffen School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry at UCLA, and Senior Extension faculty at the Department of Humanities, Sciences and Social Sciences at UCLA. She is also director of clinical training at the Lifespan Learning Institute and author of Narcissism and Intimacy, co-author ...
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Title:How People Change: Relationships And Neuroplasticity In PsychotherapyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 9.5 × 6.5 × 1.2 inPublished:May 9, 2017Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393711765

ISBN - 13:9780393711769

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Editorial Reviews

This masterful collection of essays is rich with practical insights for psychotherapists, coaches, and really anyone who helps others change for the better. Far-reaching, lucid, full of heart, and highly recommended. — Rick Hanson, PhD, author of Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and WisdomEach of the chapters—or better yet, each of the authors—in this book is authentic in the way that Bromberg uses in his chapter. Each therapist, and each is a master at doing therapy, expresses their individual struggle with the question of how change in therapy happens, and how to make meaning out of a change process that can only be apprehended through experience and eludes colonization by words. And yet something special goes on as you read the words. It will be a realization of authenticity between you and the writer, an expanding dyadic experience that is emergent and surpasses the limitations of language and symbols. It is a dyadic state bringing you a new clarity of expanding understanding of what you always knew but didn't know you knew. — Ed Tronick, PhD, Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Director, Child Development Unit