How Should We Talk About Religion?: Perspectives, Contexts, Particularities

Paperback | June 30, 2006

EditorJames Boyd White

not yet rated|write a review
"Avoiding the recriminatory rhetoric that all too often pervades cultural, political, and scholarly debates, the authors of these first-rate essays reveal the many ways in which sensitivity to religious belief, thought, and discourse enhances and, in many respects, is absolutely necessary to serious inquiry in their diverse areas of expertise." —Joseph A. Buttigieg, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English, University of Notre Dame
 
In this wide-ranging and timely volume, fourteen scholars address the important question, How should we talk about religion, whether our own or the religion of others? They confront such fundamental topics as the sufficiency of "reason" for a full life; the adequacy of our methods of describing and analyzing religion; the degree to which any serious confrontation with the religious experiences of others will challenge our own; and whether there can be a pluralism that does not dissolve into universal relativism. 
 
Writing from a diversity of perspectives and academic disciplines—philosophy, classics, medieval studies, history, anthropology, economics, political science, and art history, among others—the contributors illuminate issues at the heart of the most significant cultural, social, and political debates of our day.
 
What emerges is not a univocal answer to the question posed in the title. Instead, by demonstrating how religion is talked about in the languages of very different academic disciplines, the essayists creatively address issues that no one should ignore: fundamentalism; the role of religion in American democracy; the tension between secular liberalism and religious rhetoric; monotheism versus pluralism; and the relationship between poverty and liberation theology. Collectively, their various approaches to talking about religion—differences due to background, age, nationality, religious outlook, and intellectual commitment, yet all valid—provide a general response to the question in the book's title: in intellectual and personal community.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$52.00

Ships within 3-5 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

"Avoiding the recriminatory rhetoric that all too often pervades cultural, political, and scholarly debates, the authors of these first-rate essays reveal the many ways in which sensitivity to religious belief, thought, and discourse enhances and, in many respects, is absolutely necessary to serious inquiry in their diverse areas of ex...

James Boyd White is Hart Wright Professor of Law, professor of English, and adjunct professor of classical studies at the University of Michigan. Contributors: Luis E. Bacigalupo, Clifford Ando, Sabine MacCormack, R. Scott Appleby, Bilinda Straight, Patrick J. Deneen, Wayne C. Booth (1921–2005), Eugene Garver, Javier Iguíñiz Echeverría...

other books by James Boyd White

Law and Democracy in the Empire of Force
Law and Democracy in the Empire of Force

Kobo ebook|Dec 18 2009

$53.89 online$70.00list price(save 23%)
When Words Lose Their Meaning: Constitutions and Reconstitutions of Language, Character, and…
When Words Lose Their Meaning: Constitutions and Recons...

Kobo ebook|Dec 21 2012

$38.39 online$49.87list price(save 23%)
Living Speech: Resisting the Empire of Force
Living Speech: Resisting the Empire of Force

Kobo ebook|Feb 9 2009

$40.39 online$52.43list price(save 22%)
see all books by James Boyd White
Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.9 inPublished:June 30, 2006Publisher:University Of Notre Dame PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0268044074

ISBN - 13:9780268044077

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of How Should We Talk About Religion?: Perspectives, Contexts, Particularities

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

"Common themes thread their way through these 14 essays. All contributors agree that recriminatory rhetoric does not listen or grant legitimacy to other religions or religious views. If one is to talk about religion, the rhetoric requires a pluralism that does not dissolve into universal relativism. . . Both scholars and laypeople will likely profit from this volume." —Choice