How the English Created Canada: An Intriguing History of Explorers, Rogues, Fur Traders, Pioneers, Prime Ministers, Heroes and Scou by Jeff PearceHow the English Created Canada: An Intriguing History of Explorers, Rogues, Fur Traders, Pioneers, Prime Ministers, Heroes and Scou by Jeff Pearce

How the English Created Canada: An Intriguing History of Explorers, Rogues, Fur Traders, Pioneers…

byJeff Pearce

Paperback | April 15, 2009

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Jeff Pearce's irreverent romp through the annals of the history of the English in Canada: * This was the territory that England used as the staging ground for many battles and wars with the French and the Americans * It was an Englishman, John Graves Simcoe, who enacted the first anti-slavery act for the entire British Empire...right here in Canada! * Sir Isaac Brock was a larger-than-life hero of the war of 1812, who dared a duelist to shoot at him from the distance of the width of a handkerchief and who bluffed his way into capturing Detroit * Get to know the fabulous fraud Grey Owl, who didn't want to be an Englishman at all and who started the conservationist movement * Our English connects help explain the October Crisis, an episode in our history still greatly misunderstood * The British North America Act (BNA) governed Canada until our constitution was repatriated in 1981. * So make yourself a cup of tea and tuck into an insightful and intriguing chronicle of how there will always be an England...in Canada.
JEFF PEARCE began his writing and journalism career over 25 years ago when he sold his first article to the Winnipeg Sun. A journalism graduate from the Creative Communications program at Red River Community College, Jeff has worked as a writer and editor for TV and magazines, both in Canada and the UK. In 2005, he taught journalism on...
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Title:How the English Created Canada: An Intriguing History of Explorers, Rogues, Fur Traders, Pioneers…Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 8.25 × 5.25 × 0.63 inPublished:April 15, 2009Publisher:Dragon Hill PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1896124208

ISBN - 13:9781896124209

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A lot of fun! Has stories and info you never learned in school I ordered this book as a gift for a relative with English ancestry and wound up reading his copy myself in three days! The writer has a wonderful conversational style, and you feel like you're sitting around a fire, listening to a great storyteller. I never learned any of this when I had to take history and now I'm pushing this book on my teenagers! I've never seen this writer on the racks before but please get him to do more!!
Date published: 2009-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A wonderfully entertaining read! Canadian history as it SHOULD be written! In this unassuming little volume, Jeff Pearce takes us on an exciting romp through more than 300 years of Canada's past. It's chatty, full of anecdotes and movie-style scenes and sometimes irreverently hilarious. It may be called "How the English Created Canada" but Pearce's goal seems to be to clear the dusty shelves and let in the fresh air on all our history. Pearce also seems to have the right intuition for what will click with the reader. He outright banishes almost all the explorers that so bored us to death in classrooms and pushes us headlong into the drama and tragedy of the Acadians, how Quebec played a part in sparking the American Revolution and the War of 1812. In the back, it says our guide is a novelist and produced playwright, and it shows -- we get a sense of how Wolfe was unstable and what a charismatic figure Isaac Brock must have been. One minor criticism is that the book seems to zip by and completely ignore the Second World War, but the history makes it clear it's focusing on English cultural impact, and probably much of that had its real effect out of the First World War. So the writer can be somewhat forgiven. Thoroughly entertaining, I'm looking forward to what Mr. Pearce writes next in the way of history.
Date published: 2009-06-15