How the West Was Lost: The Transformation Of Kentucky From Daniel Boone To Henry Clay by Stephen AronHow the West Was Lost: The Transformation Of Kentucky From Daniel Boone To Henry Clay by Stephen Aron

How the West Was Lost: The Transformation Of Kentucky From Daniel Boone To Henry Clay

byStephen Aron

Paperback | March 4, 1999

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Eighteenth-century Kentucky was a place where Indian and European cultures collided-and, surprisingly, coincided. But this mixed world did not last, and it eventually gave way to nineteenth-century commercial and industrial development. How the West Was Lost tracks the overlapping conquest, colonization, and consolidation of the trans-Appalachian frontier. Not a story of paradise lost, this is a book about possibilities lost. It focuses on the common ground between Indians and backcountry settlers which was not found, the frontier customs that were not perpetuated, the lands that were not distributed equally, the slaves who were not emancipated, the agrarian democracy that was not achieved, and the millennium that did not arrive. Seeking to explain why these dreams were not realized, Stephen Aron shows us what did happen during Kentucky's tumultuous passage from Daniel Boone's world to Henry Clay's.

Stephen Aron is an associate professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles.
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Title:How the West Was Lost: The Transformation Of Kentucky From Daniel Boone To Henry ClayFormat:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.69 inPublished:March 4, 1999Publisher:Johns Hopkins University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801861985

ISBN - 13:9780801861987

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Reviews

From Our Editors

It is a celebrated time in American history, a time when Indian and European cultures collided. How the West Was Lost examines 18th-century Kentucky and how it eventually gave way to 19th-century commercial and industrial development. This is a book about lost possibilities, as it focuses on the common ground between Indians and backcountry settlers never found, the lands never distributed equally and the slaves who never received emancipation.

Editorial Reviews

How the West Was Lost engages the reader; it actually asks us to think about the issues it raises rather than accept the author's conclusions as a definitive last word on them. Aron has written a book that demands that attention be paid to trans-Appalachia's important role in the conquest of North America while it underscores the contested nature of its history. And for that, we are all in his debt.