How Tia Lola Learned To Teach by Julia AlvarezHow Tia Lola Learned To Teach by Julia Alvarez

How Tia Lola Learned To Teach

byJulia Alvarez

Paperback | September 13, 2011

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Tía Lola has been invited to teach Spanish at her niece and nephew’s elementary school. But Miguel wants nothing to do with the arrangement. He hasn’t had an easy time adjusting to his new school in Vermont and doesn’t like living so far away from Papi, who has a new girlfriend and an announcement to make. On the other hand, Miguel’s little sister, Juanita, can’t wait to introduce her colorfully dressed aunt with her migrating beauty mark to all her friends at school—that is, if she can stop getting distracted long enough to remember to do so. Before long, Tía Lola is organizing a Spanish treasure hunt and a Carnaval fiesta at school. Will Miguel be willing to join the fun? Will Juanita get her head out of the clouds and lead her classmates to victory in the treasure hunt?
Told with abundant humor and heart, Julia Alvarez’s new Tía Lola story is the long-awaited sequel to the beloved How Tía Lola Came to Visit Stay.



From the Hardcover edition.
Julia Alvarez’s novels for young readers include Return to Sender, Finding Miracles, Before We Were Free, and How Tía Lola Came to Visit Stay, which Kirkus Reviews praised as “simple, bella, un regalo permanente; simple and beautiful, a gift that will stay.” She is also the award-winning author of How the García Girls Lost Their Accent...
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Title:How Tia Lola Learned To TeachFormat:PaperbackDimensions:144 pages, 7.63 × 5.19 × 0.35 inPublished:September 13, 2011Publisher:Random House Children's BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0375857923

ISBN - 13:9780375857928

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Read from the Book

Buenas razones cautivan los corazones   Good intentions win hearts     "Mami, why is Tia Lola so scared to be a teacher?" Juanita wants to know. Mami is tucking her into bed. Juanita has been pleading for five more minutes so she can read another chapter in her book. But Mami has ruled that Monday through Thursday, lights must be out promptly by eight p.m. Otherwise, Juanita is too tired to pay attention the next day in class.   Mami sighs. "I think Tia Lola doesn't feel confident because she never went past fourth grade."   "I haven't gone past fourth grade either," Juanita reminds her.   "I know, Juanita." Mami smiles fondly at her daughter. "But you're only eight. And Tia Lola, well, she's past fifty. She thinks she's not smart enough to teach the kids at your school."   "But that's ridiculous, Mami!" Juanita says importantly. It feels so grown-up to be able to pronounce something ridiculous. "Tia Lola knows so much. All these stories and songs and sayings. And she knows how to cook and make friends and . . ." Juanita runs out of breath before she has run out of things Tia Lola knows how to do.   "Would you do me a favor, Nita bonita?" Her mami always calls Juanita by her nickname and then adds the Spanish word for "pretty" when she is asking for something that will take extra effort. "Could you tell your tia Lola what you just told me? Tell her you'd love for her to come to your school. That it'll be just like taking care of you and Miguel, except that you'll have a few friends along. . . ."   "Like seventy-four--sorry, seventy-six, counting Nita and me." Miguel is at the door. He must have overheard Mami discussing Mrs. Stevens's invitation.   Mami looks at Miguel in that careful way, trying to figure out what he is feeling. She works at the college, counseling students who feel confused or troubled. Except Miguel isn't confused or troubled. He just thinks that adults should go to work somewhere besides where their kids go to school.   "Do you not want Tia Lola to volunteer at Bridgeport?" Mami asks carefully.   Miguel squirms. He's not sure he wants Tia Lola at his school every single day. But his mother is looking disappointed. "How about if Tia Lola just comes sometimes?" Miguel suggests.   "You know, Miguel Angel Guzman, you might just have hit on a brilliant idea!"   Miguel blinks in disbelief. "I have?"   "He has?" Juanita echoes.   Mami nods, ignoring the sparks flying between brother and sister. "I think it'll be less scary for Tia Lola to start by volunteering once a week, say. She can think of it as just visiting, not teaching. Then, once she gets used to it, she can go more often."  From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

“A welcome return for a wonderful character whose heart encompasses the whole world.” —School Library Journal

“Alvarez invites everybody-no matter their background-into this welcoming family and community.” —The Horn Book


From the Hardcover edition.